Posts Tagged ‘Australia’

18 October

First Day of the Race at World Solar Challenge 2015

Share

Dear Friends, Visitors/Viewers/Readers,

(Please click on red links & note magenta)

Above is the Bridgestone report on the first day of the race at World Solar Challenge 2015 at State Square right in front of the Parliament House of Darwin, Australia, starting at 8:30 a.m. sharp.

There has been a dramatic increase of the number of people with camera equipments, ready to record this exciting moment in human history, during the transition between ICE (Internal Combustion Engine) and ESV (Electric Solar Vehicle) engine. For those of you who have not read our previous post on “100% Electric Transportation and 100% Solar By 2030“, have a look at the pattern of history of change and appreciate why there is so much excitement for this event, World Solar Challenge. For we are all witnessing and in so doing, helping to accelerate the change. We cannot wait for the day when electric solar vehicles would be part of the mainstream!

P.S. Understanding such infectious excitement for the race, it would be greatly appreciated if some of the reporters or camera people would stay behind the barriers provided in the viewing area in order to avoid difficulty for the drivers or audiences in the future.

~have a bright and sunny day~

Gathered, written, and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker

Any comments and suggestions are welcomed at sunisthefuture@gmail.com

Please also get into the habit of checking at these sites below for more on solar energy topics:

www.sunisthefuture.net

www.youtube.com/user/sunisthefuture

www.kiva.org/team/sunisthefuture

www.facebook.com/sunisthefuture

www.pinterest.com/sunisthefuture

HTML adl

Google+

Share
17 October

Cars of The Future-Solar Cars Will Take On Challenges Between Darwin & Adelaide, Australia, During Bridgestone World Solar Challenge 2015

Share

Dear Friends, Visitors/Viewers/Readers,

World Solar Challenge Route (courtesy of World Solar Challenge)

World Solar Challenge Route (courtesy of World Solar Challenge)


(Please click on red links & note magenta)

As solar energy and solar car enthusiasts, and solar car racers and teams from all corners of the globe converge upon Darwin, Australia, awaiting for the first day of this year’s Bridgestone World Solar Challenge 2015, these 44 teams from 25 countries/regions are taking on the ultimate endurance challenge in the harshest of climates to demonstrate to the world that our automotive future will be shaped by the solar energy. This 3,000 kilometer event between Darwin and Adelaide, Australia, will begin from the State Square (in front of the Parliament House) of Darwin, Australia, on Sunday, October 18, 2015, at 8:30 a.m., and the leading cars are expected to arrive late on Wednesday (Oct. 21, 2015) or early Thursday (Oct. 22, 2015), finishing at the City of Adelaide’s Victoria Square, Australia.

To give you a feel of what these solar cars might be like, allow me to present to you what took place during the last race, World Solar Challenge 2013, below:

In case you’re wondering who was/is the organizer of this energizing event, let’s take a look at what the event organizer Mr. Chris Selwood said during World Solar Challenge 2013, below:

 Historically, this event is full of enthusiasts for solar and renewable energy, imbued with much spirit of collaboration, learning, and innovation. Let’s get a closer look at some of these participants and solar cars from previous race in 2013, below:

  1. World Solar Challenge (Solar Car Race) 2013-Day 1
  2. NUNA7 (netherlands) Is The First To Arrive at Finish Point of World Solar Challenge 2013
  3. Necessary Supports For World Solar Challenge 2013
  4. World Solar Challenge 2013 Final Result
  5. World Solar Challenge 2013 Event Update

The Cruiser Class was added for the first time in 2013 and its winner in 2013 was Stella, below:

(There are now three classes in the race: Challenger, Cruiser, Adventure)

 Since last race in 2013, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of entries for Cruiser Class (up to 11 in 2015). For a complete list of all the entering solar cars this year–>click HERE.

For an overview of this race so far (thanks to Bridgestone), please take a look at these videos below:

    1. World Solar Challenge 2015 Introduction, below:

         2. Day 1 Report of World Solar Challenge 2015 (prior to the race) , below:


3. Day 2 Report of World Solar Challenge 2015 (prior to the race), below:

  4. Day 3 Report of World Solar Challenge 2015 (prior to the race):

Here, at Sun Is The Future, we wish all participating teams a good night’s rest and a great journey! Keep in mind that we earthlings all owe a great deal to these energizing people for being the forerunners of the Solar/Renewable Future! More will be reported on World Solar Challenge 2015 in future posts.

 ~have a bright and sunny day~

Gathered, written, and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker

Any comments and suggestions are welcomed at sunisthefuture@gmail.com

Please also get into the habit of checking at these sites below for more on solar energy topics:

www.sunisthefuture.net

www.youtube.com/user/sunisthefuture

www.kiva.org/team/sunisthefuture

www.facebook.com/sunisthefuture

www.pinterest.com/sunisthefuture

HTML adl

Google+

Share
7 September

Solar Power International 2015

Share

Dear Friends, Visitors/Viewers/Readers,


(Please click on red links & note magenta)

Just a quick reminder for you all, Solar Enthusiasts, that Solar Power International 2015 will be held on September 14-17, 2015 at Anaheim, CA, at Anaheim Convention Center, Anaheim, CA, at 800 W Katella Ave., Anaheim, CA 92802, (714) 765-8950. This is an exciting time for solar industry in USA: 8 gigawatts of solar PV will be installed this year (2015), with California being in the forefront, having more installations than Australia, India, and Canada combined.

The above is the video of Rhone Resch, President & CEO of SEIA, inviting you all to attend the Solar Power International 2015. There will be more than 600 exhibitors from around the globe, 24 hours of networking, 100+ educational opportunities, hands on training labs, and solar strategy sessions for businesses. There will also be the Startup Alley at SPI2015. An example of a business/company in Startup Alley at Solar Power International 2015, below:

 


~have a bright and sunny day~
Gathered, written, and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker

Any comments and suggestions are welcomed at sunisthefuture@gmail.com

Please also get into the habit of checking at these sites below for more on solar energy topics:

www.sunisthefuture.net

www.youtube.com/user/sunisthefuture

www.kiva.org/team/sunisthefuture

www.facebook.com/sunisthefuture

www.pinterest.com/sunisthefuture

HTML adl

Google+

Share
28 May

Let’s Follow France’s Law To Sun-Up Rooftops

Share

Dear Friends, Visitors/Viewers/Readers,

France is in favor of the Solar and  Green Future (credit: sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker)

France is in favor of the Solar and Green Future (credit: sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker)

(Please click on red links & note magenta)

C., thank you for alerting me to the law that was recently (in March, 2015) passed by the French governing body, requiring roof tops of new French commercial buildings to be either partially covered by solar panels

Solar PV (credit: sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker)

Solar PV (credit: sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker)

or plants. This law was the product of compromise between French environmentalists and the more conservative members of the parliament. Initially, the French environmental activists wanted to make it mandatory to have all new buildings to be covered with green roofs, but the Socialist government convinced these activists to limit the scope of the law to new commercial buildings/rooftops.

Hopefully, this law will enable France to catch up to its neighbors.  Solar PV capacity in France has increased much more slowly than in Germany, Spain or Italy in the past, Reuters reported in November of 2014. In June of last year, France had 5,095 megawatts of PV capacity, accounting for 1 percent of the energy consumption in the first half of 2014. Neighboring Germany had almost 37,000 MW.

Other places such as Australia, Germany, Canada, and Britain already have green roofs as part of their urban landscape. As a matter of fact, Toronto has mandatory green roofs  as part of its by-laws since 1998.

Green Roof of Chicago City Hall ( attribution: Tony The Tiger)

Green Roof of Chicago City Hall ( attribution: Tony The Tiger)

Green roof  of British_Horse_Society_Head_Quarters_and_Green_Roof attribution Sky Garden Ltd

Green roof of British Horse Society Head Quarters ( attribution: Sky Garden Ltd)

 

Green roof of Tongyang downtown apartment complex (attribution: Vmenkov)

Green roof of Tongyang downtown apartment complex (attribution: Vmenkov)

 

 

Green roof of the Mountain Equipment Co-op store in Toronto, Canada (attribution: Sookie)

Green roof of the Mountain Equipment Co-op store in Toronto, Canada (attribution: Sookie)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This law will certainly help to reduce the energy needed due to urban heat island (especially notable during summer and winter) and rainwater retension (by reducing runoff problems). Please refer to the video below:

 


“This draft law is a very positive step forward and a concrete lever for greener and smarter cities,” said James Watson, CEO of the European Photovoltaic Industry Association. “There are so many unused rooftops in our cities today and solar photovoltaics is the perfect solution to make the best out of them as it can be seamlessly integrated in an urban setting.” Watson added that rooftops, large or small, represent 70 percent of the installed solar capacity in France.

“Solar electricity produced on your roof can partially or entirely instantaneously cover your own power needs,” Watson said.

In addition to cost saving, please keep in mind that in 2014, solar energy production saved about 110 million tons of carbon dioxide emissions globally.

Perhaps all governments throughout our planet should consider utilizing surface areas of the rooftops.

~have a bright and sunny day~

Gathered, written, and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker

Any comments and suggestions are welcomed at sunisthefuture@gmail.com

Please also get into the habit of checking at these sites below for more on solar energy topics:

www.sunisthefuture.net

www.youtube.com/user/sunisthefuture

www.kiva.org/team/sunisthefuture

www.facebook.com/sunisthefuture

www.pinterest.com/sunisthefuture

HTML adl

Google+

Share
6 May

Tindo, World’s First Solar eBus

Share

Dear Friends, Visitors/Viewers/Readers,

Tindo solar powered ebus2 final

(Please click on red links & note magenta)

I’ve been wanting to share this piece with you for quite some time now because transportation is responsible for almost a third of the CO2 emissions in most developed nations. So I was thrilled to find out about Tindo, the world’s first Solar Electric Bus that are being used every day by the people of Adelaide, Australia, through the Adelaide City Council’s free Adelaide Connector Bus service.

Tindo, the Kauma Aboriginal name for sun, is the culmination of the Adelaide City Council’s eight-year project to deliver a pure electric community bus. Adelaide’s air conditioned 40-seater and low-maintenance Tindo solar ebus is designed by DesignLine International, a New Zealand company. Green public transportation such as Tindo solar ebus is one of the ways to help mitigate global warming. Tindo is recharged using solar PV system at the Adelaide Central Bus station.  The solar PV system on the Bus Station’s roof is currently Adelaide’s largest grid-connected system, generating 70,000 kWh (or 70 MWh)of zero carbon emissions electricity each year to offset the total energy required to recharge Tindo’s batteries. Much of the funding for this $550,000 solar PV system was  provided by the Australian Government through the Adelaide Solar City program, with the Adelaide City Council also committing significant funding. Adelaide City Council looks forward to the future when a fleet of solar buses will be serving throughout the city of Adelaide.

Gathered, written, and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker

~have a bright and sunny day~

Please also get into the habit of checking at these sites below for more on solar energy topics: www.sunisthefuture.net

www.youtube.com/user/sunisthefuture

www.kiva.org/team/sunisthefuture

www.facebook.com/sunisthefuture

www.pinterest.com/sunisthefuture

HTML adl

Google+

Share
29 April

Solar Eclipse of April 29, 2014

Share

Dear Friends, Visitors/Viewers/Readers, (Please click on red links below),

At the right spot in Anatarctica or Australia, one could see an annular eclipse of the sun-sometimes called a ring of fire eclipse of the sun, on April 29, 2014.   This is a quick post about that annular solar eclipse, below:

Annular Solar Eclipse of April 29, 2014 (credit: wikimedia commons, Attribution: Eclipse Predictions by Fred Espenak, NASA's GSFC, ATTRIBUTION; PD-USGOV-NASA)

Annular Solar Eclipse of April 29, 2014 in Eclipse During 2014-Observer’s Handbook-2014, Royal Astroonomical Society of Canada (<—-click twice to view)

An annular solar eclipse occurred on April 29, 2014. A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby totally or partly obscuring the image of the Sun for a viewer on Earth. An annular solar eclipse occurs when the Moon’s apparent diameter is smaller than the Sun’s, blocking most of the Sun’s light and causing the Sun to look like an annulus (ring). An annular eclipse appears as a partial eclipse over a region of the Earth thousands of kilometres wide.

The center of the moon‘s shadow misses the south Pole of the Earth, but the partial eclipse is visible from parts of Antarctica and Australia.

Animated Path of Solar Eclipse of April 29, 2014 (credit: wikimedia commons)

Annularity from Antarctica-simulated view (credit: wikimedia commons)

 

~have a bright and sunny day~

Gathered, written, and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker

Any of your comments/suggestions/questions will be welcomed at sunisthefuture@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

Please also get into the habit of checking at these sites below for more on solar energy topics:

www.sunisthefuture.net

www.instagram.com/sunisthefuture

www.pinterest.com/sunisthefuture

www.facebook.com/sunisthefuture

www.youtube.com/user/sunisthefuture

www.kiva.org/team/sunisthefuture

www.sunisthefuture.com

Homepage: http://www.sunisthefuture.net HTML adl
Google+

Share
26 March

The Magnificent Solar Project of Royal Adelaide Showground of Australia

Share

Dear Friends, Visitors/Viewers/Readers, (Please click on red links below),

I’ve got quite a treat for you today!

Panoramic view of Adelaide Showground Solar Panels at Rooftop (generating 1,400 megawatt-hour of solar electricity every year) (credit: sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker)

Besides the Australian Federal Solar Incentives and Australian State Feed-In-Tariffs, Australian government also provided other forms of encouragement for solar/renewable energy projects. In 2008, Premier Mike Rann announced the $8 million investment in the largest rooftop solar installation to take place at The Royal Adelaide Showground (locally known as the Wayville Showground). The Showground is located in the inner-southern Adelaide suburb of Wayville, just south of Greenhill Road. It is bordered by Goodwood Road (east), Leader Street (south), the railway line (west) and Rose Terrace (north). The Royal Agricultural and Horticultural Society of South Australia (RAHS) has controlled the site since the 1920s, the land having been purchased by the South Australian government prior to the First World War. The Royal Adelaide Showground  moved to the present site in 1925. The Adelaide Showground has one of the largest under-cover exhibition spaces in the Southern Hemisphere, hosting over 140 exhibitions and conferences,  attracting over 1.3 million visitors each year. From its 3.5 million liter underground water tanks to its solar installation generating 1,400 megawatt hour of solar electricity each year (equivalent to the capacity of powering 250 South Australian homes, powering 40% of the total average annual Showground’s power needs, saving 1,400 tonnes of greenhouse gas emission annually), Adelaide Showground is arguably the most environmentally friendly multi-purpose venue in Australia. It also provides a valuable educational resource for the wider community (check out its Solar Power Meter below, rarely seen at any other solar rooftop installations).

We were quite fortunate to have Mr. Ross Hocking of The Adelaide Showground, showing us the Showground, talking about its history, power generation, and showing us the simple but wonderfully educational Solar Power Meter

Adelaide Showground's Solar Power Meter, indicating the solar panels are functioning at about 40% of the maximum capacity...pretty good efficiency level for a cloudy day! Standing next to the Solar Power Meter, our technical advisor at Sun Is The Future, Mr. Michael Nunamaker (credit: sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker)

Ross Hocking of Adelaide Showground (credit: sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker)

 

that I have never seen at any other solar installation sites. It is easy to see the pride of the local people in their Royal Adelaide Showground solar rooftop through the eyes of Mr. Ross Hocking.

The project is the first MW-scale industrial rooftop  solar plant in Australia and the first commercial installation of First Solar Cd-Te thin film technology. The total area of the panels is 9,239 square-meters, installed on six buildings: Goyder, Jubilee, Wayville, Dairy/Goat Pavilions, Duncan Gallery, and Ridley Center. 12,612 First Solar 77.5 watt thin film CdTe modules, manufactured in Malaysia, and 108 Suntech 210 watt polycrystalline Si modules, manufactured in China, were installed on northern facades, Jubilee and Goyder Pavilions and screens. It took just three months to complete. The system is divided into 184 sub-systems, each is monitored for power production. The thin film technology chosen for this project has better temperature tolerance than typical mono- or poly- crystalline panels. These panels are warrantied for 25 years, but are expected to last at least 30-40 years. Its estimated average 1,400 annual power production will generate a gross saving of approximately $126,000 pa. Furthermore, as an Accredited Power Station, Renewable Energy Credits (REC’s) are received for MW’s generated, estimated at about $46,000 (traded at market value).

Adelaide Showground layout, where multiple pavilions have solar installations either on the rooftop or on the side of the building (credit: sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker)

Adelaide Showground Solar Panels at Duncan Gallery (credit: sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adelaide Showground rooftop solar panels seen on multiple pavilions' rooftops (credit: sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adelaide Showground solar rooftop (credit: sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Installation of the solar panels and associated systems was managed by building and engineering company Built Environs in partnership with grid-connect solar systems provider Solar Shop Australia. Usually the panels are washed once a year. Maintenance was contracted for the first ten years by the systems integrators, Solar Shop Australia Pty Ltd, to ensure the correct functioning of all structural and electrical components.

Once again, we see the importance of effective government policy and/or actions that would benefit both the consumers and growth of solar energy industry, insuring local economic prosperity while solving a nation’s concern for energy security and environmental quality. Australian government and politicians have accomplished a great deal. Bravo!

~have a bright and sunny day~

Gathered, written, and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker

Any of your comments/suggestions/questions will be welcomed at sunisthefuture@gmail.com

Please also get into the habit of checking at these sites below for more on solar energy topics:

www.sunisthefuture.net

www.instagram.com/sunisthefuture

www.pinterest.com/sunisthefuture

www.facebook.com/sunisthefuture

www.youtube.com/user/sunisthefuture

www.kiva.org/team/sunisthefuture

www.sunisthefuture.com

Homepage: http://www.sunisthefuture.net HTML adl
Google+

Share
24 March

Australian State Feed-In-Tariffs

Share

Dear Friends, Visitors/Viewers/Readers, (Please click on red links below),

Solar Panel w/Cloud (credit: sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker). This design is also available at www.sunisthefuture.com

To continue our series of discussion on Australian Solar Incentives, in addition to Australian Federal Solar Incentives, most states also offer support for solar and other renewables via Feed-In-Tariff (FIT) schemes. Under the FIT scheme owners are paid for each unit of power that they export to the electricity grid. The FIT rates offered range from zero to as much as  66c or 68c per kWh. Most Australian states and territory governments either currently have or previously had a Solar Feed-In-Tariff  (Solar FIT) (also known as a Solar Bonus Scheme or Solar Buy-Back Scheme) in place. A uniform federal scheme to supersede all State schemes has been proposed by Tasmanian Greens Senator Christine Milne, but not enacted. National feed-in tariff systems have been enacted in numerous countries including Brazil, Canada, China and many EU countries.

There have been many changes to Feed-In-Tariff legislation in all Australian states and territories within the past two years. For an overview of these state incentives offered, please see the summary table of Australian State Government Feed-In-Tariffs Schemes, available at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feed-in_tariffs_in_Australia

Feed-in-Tariffs were introduced by a number of states in Australia to increase the amount of solar PV power generated. They can be classified by a number of factors including the price paid, whether it is on a net or gross export basis, the length of time payments are guaranteed, the maximum size of installation allowed and the type of customer allowed to participate. The Solar Feed-In-Tariff schemes currently available in Australia are predominantly “net” schemes. A net Feed-In-Tariff rewards one for each unit of solar power that one had exported to the electrical grid. The governments of New South Wales (NSW), Victoria (VIC), South Australia (SA), and Queensland (QLD) are operating under net Feed-In-Tariff scheme. Net FIT’s generally pay comparatively little to the producer (generally a household) because electricity produced by solar photovoltaic or other renewable energy just offsets the producer’s usage. Net FIT’s are referred to as “fake feed-in tariff” and is actually net metering, with a monthly payment for net generation, instead of the normal roll over. Gross tariffs conform to the normal definition of a feed-in tariff, and provide a more certain financial return, paying for all electricity produced, even if it is consumed by the producer, reducing or helping meet peak demand. If you are still not clear about the difference between gross vs net feed-in-tariff, think of net feed-in-tariff as having a cap on the amount of energy one can sell back to the grid at the level of one’s energy consumption whereas gross feed-in-tariff does not have such a cap. Many Australian state feed-in tariffs were net export tariffs, whereas conservation groups argued for gross feed-in tariffs. In March 2009, the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) started a solar gross feed-in tariff. For systems up to 10 kW the payment was 50.05 cents per kWh. For systems from 10 kW to 30 kW the payment was 40.04 cents per kWh. The payment was revised downward once before an overall capacity cap was reached and the scheme closed. Payments are made quarterly based on energy generated and the payment rate is guaranteed for 20 years.

The ACT , TAS, and New South Wales have  or had gross feed-in tariffs. Other State Governments have enacted net feed-in tariff schemes which have been criticised for not providing enough incentive for households to install solar panels and thus for not effectively encouraging the uptake of solar PV.

Australian FIT laws tend to focus on providing support to solar PV particularly in the residential context, and project limits on installed capacity (such as 10kW in NSW) mean effectively that FITs do not support large scale projects such as wind farms or solar thermal power stations.

Solar FITs are one of the key incentive mechanism for the promotion of renewable energy generation across the globe. Through FITs, Germany was able to become the world leader in rooftop solar power. China has also introduced a national FIT program in an effort to expand domestic demand for solar PV systems.

Gathered, written, and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker

Related link/URL:

Feed-In-Tariff

Decarbonisation on the Cheap, How an Electricity Efficiency Feed-In-Tariff Can Cut Energy Costs

Why FITs (from Alliance For Renewable Energy)

Any of your comments/suggestions/questions will be welcomed at sunisthefuture@gmail.com

Please also get into the habit of checking at these sites below for more on solar energy topics:

www.sunisthefuture.net

www.instagram.com/sunisthefuture

www.pinterest.com/sunisthefuture

www.facebook.com/sunisthefuture

www.youtube.com/user/sunisthefuture

www.kiva.org/team/sunisthefuture

www.sunisthefuture.com

Homepage: http://www.sunisthefuture.net HTML adl
Google+

Share
18 March

Aussie’s Transition Into Renewable Energy Age

Share

Dear Friends, Visitors/Viewers/Readers, (Please click on red links below),

Adelaide Airport, where solar PVs are installed on the roof, resulting from solar feed-in-tariff introduced by Premier Mike Rann (credit: sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker)

Due to our previous post on Darwin’s Blackout, let’s take a look at some of the recent developments of Renewable Energy policies in Australia.

Back in 2006, about 9,500 GWh (gigawatt-hours) of Australian electricity came from renewable sources, representing less than 4% of  nationally generated electricity. By 2011, that number moved up to approximately 29,302 GWh and to 29,678 GWh by 2012, representing 13.14% of the total production in Australia.

Similar to many other countries, government policy in response to concern for climate change, energy independence, and economic stimulus has been the driving force behind encouraging the development of renewable energy. A key policy that has been in place since 2001 to encourage large-scale renewable energy development is a mandatory renewable energy target (MRET), which in 2010 was increased to 41,000 GWh of renewable generation from power stations. There is also the Small-Scale Renewable Energy Scheme, an uncapped scheme to support rooftop solar power and solar hot water and several State schemes providing feed-in tariffs to encourage photovoltaics. In 2012, these policies have been supplemented by a carbon price and a 10 billion-dollar fund to finance renewable energy projects.

Based on a survey result indicated in Angus Reid Global Monitor (June 25, 2007), there is/was considerable public support for the use of renewable energy and energy efficiency in Australia.

It has also been suggested that with sufficient public and private sector investment and government policy certainty, Australia could switch entirely to renewable energy within a decade by building additional large-scale solar and wind power developments, upgrading to transmission infrastructure and introduction of appropriate energy efficiency measures.

The amount of installed PV capacity in Australia has increased 10-fold between 2009 and 2011. Feed-in-tariffs and mandatory renewable energy targets specifically designed to assist renewable energy commercialization in Australia have largely been responsible for the rapid increase.  In South Australia, Premier Mike Rann introduced a solar feed in tariff for households and an educational program that involved installing photovoltaics on the roofs of major public buildings such as the Adelaide Airport, State Parliament, Museum, Art Gallery and several hundred public schools. In 2008 Premier Rann announced funding for $8 million worth of solar panels on the roof of the new Goyder Pavilion at the Royal Adelaide Showgrounds, the largest roof top solar installation in Australia, qualifying it for official “power station” status. South Australia has the highest per capita take up of household solar power in Australia. The first commercial-scale PV power plant was opened in 2011, the Uterne Solar Power Station, a 1MW capacity grid-connected solar photovoltaic system located 5 km south of Alice Springs in the Northern Territory. The second opened in 2012 at Greenough River Solar Farm with a capacity of 10 MW. The price of photovoltaics has been decreasing, and in January of 2013, was less than half the cost of using grid electricity in Australia.

A closer look at some of the incentive policies mentioned above will be presented in the following posts.

Related article/site below:

http://ret.cleanenergyregulator.gov.au/

http://www.adelaideairport.com.au/assets/pdfs/sustainability/factsheets/AAL_Solar_display_fact_Sheet.pdf

~have a bright and sunny day~

Gathered, written, and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker

Any of your comments/suggestions/questions will be welcomed at sunisthefuture@gmail.com

Please also get into the habit of checking at these sites below for more on solar energy topics:

www.sunisthefuture.net

www.instagram.com/sunisthefuture

www.pinterest.com/sunisthefuture

www.facebook.com/sunisthefuture

www.youtube.com/user/sunisthefuture

www.kiva.org/team/sunisthefuture

www.sunisthefuture.com

Homepage: http://www.sunisthefuture.net HTML adl Google+

Share
14 March

Darwin’s Blackout

Share

Dear Friends, Visitors/Viewers/Readers, (Please click on red links below),

Australian Sun seen from Brisbane Botanic Garden (credit: sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker)

As cities expand, population density increases, but without sufficient redundancy built-in the grid system, incidents such as this, below, will likely to appear.


On Wednesday, March 12, 2014, a tripped circuit breaker at Hudson Creek substation activated a protection system at the Channel Island power station, shutting down its transmission capacity, affecting more than 130,000 people. This power failure brought the city of Darwin, Australia, almost to a complete standstill. This blackout stretched all the way to Katherine (about 320 km south-east), Palmerston, and Pine Creek.

During this period of shut down (it took about 14 hours before 80% of the Darwin residents had their power restored),  the public service and most businesses shut down, the city bus service suspended, traffic light across the city were out (with police manning intersections), air conditioning was not available, etc.

“While it wasn’t an emergency situation, it was a crisis,” Chief Minister Adam Giles told reporters on Wednesday afternoon.

“We’ve never, ever experienced anything like this,” said Opposition Leader Delia Lawrie.

To quote from a petition to the Prime Minister Singh of India in 2012 when India was experiencing blackout:

It’s time to invest in energy efficiency and decentralized renewable energy/solar energy for all.

It is time to deploy lots of distributed solar and efficiency because solar is available when most needed, during peak hours. And efficiency makes the peak smaller so less power is needed in the first place.

~may we all have a bright and sunny day~

Gathered, written, and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker

Any of your comments/suggestions/questions are welcomed at sunisthefuture@gmail.com

www.sunisthefuture.net

www.instagram.com/sunisthefuture

www.pinterest.com/sunisthefuture

www.facebook.com/sunisthefuture

www.youtube.com/user/sunisthefuture

www.kiva.org/team/sunisthefuture

www.sunisthefuture.com

Homepage: http://www.sunisthefuture.net HTML adl Google+

Share

Copyright © 2011-2018 · Susan Sun Nunamaker All Rights Reserved · Sunisthefuture.net