Posts Tagged ‘Deep Space Climate Observatory’

8 May

It’s Luck Until You’ve Done It Twice-Falcon 9 Has Done It Again!

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Dear Friends, Visitors/Viewers/Readers,

This is a repost from one of the recent posts of Windermere Sun (www.WindermereSun.com).

Reason I am posting/reposting this piece is because almost all of our satellites currently in operation are powered by Solar Panels.

(Please click on red links & note magenta)

Falcon 9 First Stage Landing (credit: SpaceX)

Falcon 9 First Stage Landing (credit: SpaceX)

Falcon 9 Launch and Landing Streak (credit: SpaceX)

Falcon 9 Launch and Landing Streak (credit: SpaceX)

The Launch (credit: SpaceX)

The Launch (credit: SpaceX)

SpaceX-Launch_of_Falcon_9_carrying_ORBCOMM_OG2-M1

SpaceX-Launch_of_Falcon_9_carrying_ORBCOMM_OG2-M1

Windermere Blue Sunset (credit: Windermere Sun-Susan Sun Nunamaker)

(Please click on red links & note magenta)

Falcon 9 Launched and Landed Successfully on Atlantic Ship on May 6, 2016, From Cape Canaveral, While Observing the 4R’s (Recycle-Reuse-Repair-Reduce).

Out of his concern for the future of mankind and desire to reduce the risk of human extinction , reduce the cost of space transportation, and making human life multiplanetary possible via setting up a human colony on Mars, Elon Musk became the founder, CEO and CTO of SpaceX .

SpaceX-Falcon_9_carrying_CRS-7_Dragon_on_SLC-40_pad

SpaceX-Falcon_9_carrying_CRS-7_Dragon_on_SLC-40_pad

SpaceX-Falcon_9_Flight_20_OG2_first_stage_post-landing

SpaceX-Falcon_9_Flight_20_OG2_first_stage_post-landing

Of the three successful landings and recoveries post-launch of Falcon 9 within the past one and half year (Dec. of 2015, April of 2016, and May 6 of 2016), May 6, 2016 is the second time the rocket has landed intact on the ship ( Falcon 9 landed on the floating drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean).

SpaceX-Falcon 9 first stage on an ASDS barge after the first successful landing at sea

SpaceX-Falcon 9 first stage on an ASDS barge after the first successful landing at sea

During May 6, 2016 Falcon 9 mission, a Japanese communication satellite is sent to a very high orbit above Earth (aka geostationary transfer orbit) despite the fact that the rocket is subjected to extreme velocities and re-entry heating, making it difficult to have a successful landing. But shortly after the launch, SpaceX confirmed that not only did Falcon 9 make a perfect landing, but it deployed its satellite correctly.

SpaceX will continue to attempt to land the rocket at sea/ocean for its next few launches (about two third of its overall launches) because it is safer and requires less fuel than landing on land (explained below):

Few more videos and reports of Falcon 9 launch and landing of May 6, 2016, below:

 

 

 

An in-depth summary report about Elon Musk and his SpaceX, below:

For a better understanding of SpaceX’s achievements: SpaceX’s achievements include the first privately funded, liquid-propellant rocket (Falcon 1) to reach orbit, in 2008; the first privately funded company to successfully launch, orbit and recover a spacecraft (Dragon), in 2010; and the first private company to send a spacecraft (Dragon) to the ISS, in 2012. The launch of SES-8, in 2013, was the first SpaceX delivery into geosynchronous orbit, while the launch of the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR), in 2015, was the company’s first delivery beyond Earth orbit. On December 21, 2015, SpaceX successfully returned a first stage back to the launch site and accomplished a vertical landing, the first such accomplishment by a rocket on an orbital trajectory. On April 8, 2016, with the launch of CRS-8, SpaceX successfully vertically landed a first stage on an ocean drone platform and delivered Dragon to Low Earth Orbit. On May 6, 2016, SpaceX again landed a first stage, but on a geostationary transfer mission, another first.

Below is a video of Elon Musk discussing successful landing at CRS-8 press conference in April of 2016. Now, SpaceX/Falcon 9 has successfully done it (landed at sea on the ship) again! The future is more certain.


Furthermore, SpaceX is able to reduce the cost of the design and therefore cost of the space transport through a reusable launch system. A reusable launch system (RLS, or reusable launch vehicle, RLV) is a launch system which is capable of launching a payload into space more than once. This contrasts with expendable launch systems, where each launch vehicle is launched once and then discarded. No completely reusable orbital launch system is currently in use. The closest example was the partially reusable Space Shuttle. The orbiter, which included the Space Shuttle main engines, and the two solid rocket boosters, were reused after several months of refitting work for each launch. The external tank and launch vehicle load frame were discarded after each flight. However, several at least partially reusable systems are currently under development, such as the Falcon 9 full thrust (first stage).

Hurray For Elon and His Team For Ushering In the 4R’s: Recycle-Reuse-Repair-Reduce into 21st Century Space Exploration! Hurray For Elon and His Team For Bringing Back Our Hope and Enthusiasm For Space Exploration Again!

SpaceX-Dragon_capsule_and_SpaceX_employees

SpaceX-Dragon_capsule_and_SpaceX_employees

~Let’s Help One Another~
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Gathered, written, and posted by Windermere Sun-Susan Sun Nunamaker
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