Posts Tagged ‘Denmark’

29 November

People Have Spoken-Keep The Oil In The Ground & Let The SunShine In

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Dear Friends, Visitors/Viewers/Readers,

"Our shoes will march for us." Nicole Ghio of the Sierra Club

“Our shoes will march for us.” Symbolic & poignant Silent March by 20,000 pairs of shoes in Paris on Nov. 29, 2015. (credit: Nicole Ghio of the Sierra Club)

(Please click on red links & note magenta)

I’ve been away for quite a while. But this event definitely needs to be shared, despite how busy life may get. Even though the focus of Sun Is The Future is to promote, educate, and share information regarding solar energy, please do keep in mind that the transition into use of solar energy would help to reduce pollution, solve energy problem, slow down climate change, eliminate international conflicts, and generate local jobs and economy.

This may seem to be the worst of times, but it holds the promise of a future for the best of times….on this eve of the COP 21 climate talks (when leaders of nearly 200 countries will be joining for a global conference on climate change in Paris), climate activists and Parisians once again stepped up with creativity, in Place de Republique, to demonstrate not only to those in the City of the Light, but also to all of those around the world: placing about 20,000 pairs of shoes as a symbol of the poignant “silent march,” after being told by French authorities that they couldn’t march in Paris.This is a way of symbolically and powerfully joining the climate march and each pair of shoes shows the determination of Parisians to have their voices heard on climate change,” said Iain Keith of Avaaz, which helped plan the action. UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon dropped off a pair of his running shoes, saying, “As the world gathers in Paris to stand up for climate action, let us also stand in the shoes of all victims of terrorism, war and persecution and respond with compassion.” Pope Francis sent along a pair of shoes to be placed on his behalf.

Human Chain in Paris demanding the oil be kept under the ground (credit: 360.org)

Human Chain (nearly 10,000 people participated in the human chain, according to Agence France Presse) in Paris demanding the oil to be kept under the ground (credit: 350.org)



When the clock struck noon in Paris today (Nov. 29, 2015), thousands of Parisians and activists joined hands to form a human chain down Boulevard Voltaire, starting from Place de Republique, passing the Bataclan Theater (where most of the lives were taken during the tragic attacks of November 13th), and down to Place de la Nation. At the Bataclan, participants left a 100-meter gap for the memorials that line the sidewalks. Nearly 10,000 people participated in this human chain, according to Agence France Presse.

Human Chain in Paris (credit: Ben & Jerry's)

Human Chain in Paris, on November 29, 2015, from near Place de Republique to Place de la Nation  (credit: Ben & Jerry’s)

We joined hands today against climate change and violence,” said Hoda Baraka, Global Communications Manager for 350.org. “People here in Paris, and hundreds of thousands who are taking part in climate marches worldwide, have a clear message for world leaders: keep fossil fuels in the ground and finance a just transition to 100% renewable energy.” In London an estimated 50,000 showed up. In Belfast and Berlin and Barcelona, climate activists took to the streets. Here in the United States, climate marches are underway in New York and Nashville, in Louisville and (later today) in Los Angeles. In Bargny, Senegal, demonstrators flowed through the streets. Please allow me to share some of the images by 350.org of marches (Global Climate March) that broke out in Africa, Asia, Australia, Middle East, Europe, and North and South America.

Climate March Nov 2015-Bargny Senegal (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Bargny Senegal (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Wellington New Zealand (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Wellington New Zealand (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Warsaw Poland (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Warsaw Poland (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Tuvalu (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Tuvalu (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Quezon City Philippines (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Quezon City Philippines (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Paris France (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Paris France (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Oakland CA (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Oakland CA (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Oakland CA 2 (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Oakland CA 2 (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Moruya New South Wales (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Moruya New South Wales (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Melbourne Vic Australia (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Melbourne Vic Australia (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Melbourne, Australia2 (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Melbourne, Australia2 (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Melbourne Australia2 350.org final

Climate March Nov 2015-Melbourne, Australia (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Melbourne, Australia (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-London England (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-London England (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Human Chain Paris (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Human Chain Paris (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Ho Chi Minh City Vietnam2 (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Ho Chi Minh City Vietnam2 (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Ho Chi Minh City Vietnam (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Ho Chi Minh City Vietnam (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Green Groups Declare That Our Survival Is Non-Negotiable2 (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Green Groups Declare That Our Survival Is Non-Negotiable2 (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Green Groups Declare That Our Survival Is Non-Negotiable (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Green Groups Declare That Our Survival Is Non-Negotiable (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Forest City, Rockford, IL (credit: 350.org )

Climate March Nov 2015-Forest City, Rockford, IL (credit: 350.org )

Climate March Nov 2015-Fiji (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Fiji (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Dhaka Bangladesh (credit: 350.org )

Climate March Nov 2015-Dhaka Bangladesh (credit: 350.org )

Climate March Nov 2015-Coppenhagen Denmark (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Coppenhagen Denmark (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Cliffs of Moher, Ireland (credit: 350.org)

Climate March Nov 2015-Cliffs of Moher, Ireland (credit: 350.org)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is   time to let our Sun Shine In Throughout Our Planet Earth It Is Time To Let Our SunShine In for it is the Clean and Renewable Energy such as Solar and Wind Energy that will slow down the climate change, solve pollution and energy problem, reduce international conflicts, enable prosperity for clean energy industry by creating more local jobs. Leaders of the world, will you be riding on the top of the wave of  Solar Tsunami or below it ?! The decision is yours!

~have a bright and sunny day~
Any comments, suggestions, concerns regarding this post will be welcomed at sunisthefuture@gmail.com

Gathered, written, and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker

Please also get into the habit of checking at these sites below for more on solar energy topics:
www.sunisthefuture.net

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3 April

Bold, Visionary Thinking On Pathways To 100% Renewable Energy

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Dear Friends, Visitors/Viewers/Readers,

(Please click on red links below). Be sure to click on “Translate” above if any of the articles is in a language foreign to you.

It is with exciting anticipation that I would like to share this news update with you, from our friend of the Wind persuasion, below: by Paul Gipe

Increasingly countries and regions are leapfrogging timid renewable targets and moving toward full 100% integration of renewables into electricity supply. Some thought leaders, politicians, and advocates are moving even further, suggesting 150%, even 300% renewable electricity generation to meet not only electricity supply but also heat and transport.

How times have changed.

When I began my career three decades ago, our demands were modest if not meek. We could hardly imagine wind supplying more than 10% of electricity consumption. Then the California wind rush arrived in the early 1980s, and we realized that wind energy had indeed come of age as a commercial generating technology.

Our expectations increased accordingly. Wind penetration of 20% then began to seem a reasonable objective. But we stumbled badly here in the US. We turned our backs on renewables during the Reagan era.

Meanwhile, Danes continued to erect ever more wind turbines throughout the 1990s. Soon Denmark was closing on 20% of supply from wind energy alone and it became apparent—again—that our targets were too modest.

Even then I remember writing that we advocates were not suggesting that renewables would completely replace fossil fuels. No we said, we’d always need fossil fuels for some portion of supply. Wind—and solar too—would just be parts of the resource mix, maybe a big part, but still just a part.

“Facts on the ground,” as they say, were changing faster than our thinking of what was possible. With experience in Denmark, followed by that in Spain and Germany came the realization that renewables were capable of growing much faster than we had ever anticipated. Reality was overtaking our imaginations.

Today wind turbines generate nearly 30% of Danish electricity. But of course that’s not all. The Danes didn’t stop with just wind. They’ve also been building hundreds of biogas digesters and waste-to-energy plants as well. Together, wind and biomass provide 44% of the electricity consumed by Denmark’s nearly six million inhabitants. And on 20 March, just after midnight, Denmark’s wind turbines alone were generating more than 100% of the Scandinavian country’s consumption.

The list of what was once unimaginable continues to grow. Portugal’s 10 million people produced more than half their electricity in 2010 from their own indigenous renewable resources. Spain’s 40 million people meet one-third of their electrical consumption from renewables.

All of this was accomplished with policies implemented before the climate crisis was fully felt, and well before Fukushima.

In retrospect, none of this should have been surprising. After all, in the early days of electricity much of it–if not all in some regions–was generated renewably with hydroelectricity.

What was different from then was the growing role of the “new” renewable technologies, such as wind, solar, biogas, and geothermal. Also new was the observation that if we are to address climate change we have to do something about fossil fuels in transportation and heating. This was brought home to me this past summer as I sat on a panel at the World Wind Energy Association conference in Bonn titled “100% Renewable Energy”.

On the panel were two long-time renewable pioneers, Preben Maegaard from Denmark, and Johannes Lackmann from Germany. Independent of each other, both had come to the same conclusion. To address climate change and energy security, we must move well beyond 100% renewable energy in electricity supply and build an integrated network capable of using more than 150% renewable energy, up to as much as 300% renewable energy to offset fossil fuels in transportation, and heating.

This is the kind of bold, visionary thinking that is being debated in Europe. As more countries and regions adopt what was once unthinkable—100% renewable targets in electricity supply—academics and thought leaders are asking questions about what it will take to go even further.

Meanwhile, the list of countries, states, and regions with 100% renewable targets continues to grow.

Denmark

The most famous example of an ambitious target is Denmark. In the spring of last year the Danish energy minister and then holder of the EU Presidency, Martin Lindegaard issued the country’s 100% Renewable Energy Declaration.

Denmark proposes to meet more than 50% of its electricity supply with renewables by 2020, 100% of electricity and heat by 2035, and 100% in transport by 2050. “I think it’s doable, I think it’s necessary, and it’s also good for the economy,” said Lidegaard in the declaration.

Germany

Just south of the Danish border, the German state of Schleswig-Holstein has also set itself an ambitious target of 100% of interior electricity consumption by 2020.

The German states of Rheinland-Pfalz and Brandenburg have set their targets of 100% renewable for somewhat later, 2030. Brandenburg expects to meet its target in part by decreasing electricity consumption 1% per year and setting aside 2% of the state’s land area for wind energy.

The 2% rule for wind is quickly becoming the norm in Germany. This past winter, Schleswig-Holstein, which currently meets more than half its internal consumption with wind, announced that it was doubling the land area devoted to wind energy to nearly 2% to meet their renewable targets. Similarly, the German Wind Turbine Owners Association (Bundesverband WindEnergie) commissioned a study finding that Germany could meet its 2050 target for wind with 2% of the country’s land area.

The central German state of Hesse is less ambitious than its peers. Their target is 100% renewable by the more distant date of 2050.

For several years now, Germany itself has the objective of generating 80% of its electricity from Renewables by 2050. The debate has now shifted to how much sooner can they reach that target and at what will be the cost in doing so.

Germany is the hotbed of 100% Renewable discussion. This fall, the city of Kassell will host The 5th 100% Renewable Energy Regions Congress. Organizers note that more than 130 regions and municipalities have set themselves the target of providing 100% of their energy supply with renewable energy in the medium to long term.”

In fact it is small villages and towns that are driving the move toward 100% renewable energy policy in Germany just as they did with the introduction of feed-in tariffs in the 1990s. Because renewable energy is dispersed—distributed the experts say—even the smallest and most remote village can opt for locally-owned resources that offset not only their own consumption, but often much more.


Disclosure: I receive a grant from the World Future Council. The World Future Council is a co-sponsor of the conference Pathways To 100% Renewable Energy and I am a speaker at the conference.


Dardesheim bills itself as Germany’s renewable energy village, Jünde advertises as “the” bio-energy dorf, and the district of Rhein-Hunsrück along the scenic Rhine Gorge touts its target of 500% renewable energy by 2020.

In a dream come true for renewable energy advocates, German villages compete with each other for the title of who produces more renewable energy per capita. Winners are even feted with an annual award.

Europe

Talk is now shifting to European-wide targets for 2030 and beyond. All members of the European Union have binding—not “aspirational”–2020 renewable targets. Advocates are now suggesting that Europe itself could move toward 100% renewable energy by 2050.

The Austrian state of Upper Austria has set a target of 100% renewables in heat and electricity by 2030.

And of course Scotland has thumbed its collective nose at Donald Trump and set itself the very ambitious target of 100% renewables in electricity supply by 2020 mostly from wind energy.

World

And probably the most ambitious target of all is that proposed by Stanford academic Mark Jacobson in the US, and NGOs in Europe. Jacobson, the World Wildlife Fund, and others have shown that the world could produce 100% of its energy needs by 2050 with renewable energy.

USA

Closer to home, dissatisfaction with the typically timid targets found in state Renewable Portfolio Standards has led new players in the renewable arena to challenge the traditional incremental approach of established NGOs. They argue that the times demand more aggressive action—targets that are ambitious enough to elicit the dreams and hopes of Americans–and the policies to match them.

Some communities, such as Greensburg, Kansas are taking action into their own hands. After a tornado leveled the city in 2007, the community decided to do things differently when they rebuilt. One of their objectives was to rebuild with 100% renewable energy.

Fortunately, Greensburg is not alone. Other cities across the country are taking up the cause. It is this ambition that has driven the first conference of its kind in the US, a conference on how to move American’s toward 100% renewable energy. Like the past four such conferences held in Germany, the conference features thought leaders, politicians, and academics at the forefront of this global new movement.

Pathways To 100% Renewable Energy will focus on 100% renewable energy targets and how to get there. Scheduled for 16 April 2013 at the Fort Mason Conference Center in San Francisco, the conference brings the discussion of the future of renewable energy full circle. California was the crucible where the modern renewable energy industry and its potential was forged. The state has long since given up its role as a leader in the renewable energy revolution, but the budding movement toward 100% renewable energy could re-awaken the Golden State’s pioneering spirit.


If you have any question or comments about this particular post, please email Paul Gipe at :  pgipe@igc.org

~have a bright and sunny day~

posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker

Any of your comments or suggestions are welcomed below or at sunisthefuture@gmail.com

Homepage: http://www.sunisthefuture.net

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2 October

Solar Decathlon Europe 2012: Ecolar-Odoo-Fold-Prispa

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Dear Friends & Visitors/Viewers/Readers,

(Please click on red link below)

This video is a composite of four designs of Solar Decathlon Europe 2012 at Madrid, Spain:
1. Ecolar Home of Scolar Team from University of Applied Sciences Konstanz of Germany
2. Odoo of Odooproject from Budapest University of Technology Y Economics of Hungary
3. Fold of Team DTU from Technical University of Denmark of Denmark
4. Prispa of Prispa Team of “Ion Mincu” University of Architecture and Urbanism Technical University of Civil Engineering of Bucharest University Politechnica of Bucharest of Romania


Ecolar, as the name suggests, is comprised of the amalgamation of “ecological” , “solar”, “economic” and “modular”.In this case, the constructive material is wood and the hollow spaces are filled with an insulation of hemp, providing a high bearing capacity and good insulation values. Its flexible joints enable the extension and deconstruction of all or part of the building. Identical columns and beams can be produced in series to reduce manufacturing cost with high level of accuracy. Three different facade elements have been selected and optimized for climate conditions and orientations to the sun of Madrid: the northern and southern walls are designed as translucent elements, the eastern and western facades are opaque and comprise a newly developed solar-hybrid -system. Its roof is covered with innovative solar panels available in an opaque and a semi-transparent design;the multifunctional panels has many different purposes: water bearing surfaces, active and passive heating, cooling, and generation of electricity. Flexibility and modularity are seen in its Super cabinet and furniture. And an intelligent home automation system provides maximum comfort while meeting high energy standards.

The 2nd design, Odoo, offers a healthier and more sustainable lifestyle, spending up to 50% of time under the open sky. The Hungarian students designed a summer kitchen and resting area where daily activities such as cooking, dining, relaxing, and working are carries out at great comfort level.They integrated the solar panels of the roof and the facade to become dominant aesthetic and architectural elements, defining the appearance of the house. Odoo featured a unique passive surface heating-cooling system, solving the issue of lacking thermal mass by adding insulated water tanks filled with collected rainwater. The tank is connected to the piping running in the floor and ceiling by a heat exchanger device.

The third design, the Fold, take energy efficiency and livability to a new level. The elegant thinfilm solar cells on the roof cover a hot water system . The 86 mm thick PVT system contributes to the house with electricity and hot water. The architectural concept of Fold is made possible by combination of very strong Finnish Kerto wood and Rockwool Aerowolle (slabs are constructed as sandwich elements with Kerto wood on both sides and Rockwool between the wooden slabs.) On both sides of the slabs a layer of high-insulating Rockwool Aerowolle is mounted. This construction prevents thermal bridges, minimizing the thickness of the slabs to create the slender Fold. Traditional floor heating panels are placed on both floor and ceiling surfaces. The PVT system on the roof supplies the floor heating with hot water and a callibrated control system and the high- performance Nilan unit converts the heat from PVTs into energy to drive the cooling system placed in the ceiling.

Finally, Prispa of Romania, finds alternative solutions to expensive systems: its modularity and simplicity makes it easy to assemble, disassemble, and expand the house, using I-joists beams (double T-shaped beams with an OSB heart and wooden feet). There is the air-to-air heat exchanger insuring fresh air and diminishing the heat load during summer. Strategic placing of thermal mass material on the floor near the South glazed surfaces to absorb natural heat from the sun or the radiant panels on the walls (clay finish for regulating humidity).
~have a bright and sunny day~
There is always more on solar energy at http://www.sunisthefuture.net
Any of your comments/suggestions will be welcomed at sunisthefuture@gmail.com
sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker
Homepage:  http://www.sunisthefuture.net


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