Posts Tagged ‘EIA’

23 June

Florida Solar

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Dear Friends, Visitors/Viewers/Readers,

Lake Butler Chain (photo by Susan Sun Nunamaker, presented at: WindermereSun.com))

Windermere Blue Sunset (credit: Windermere Sun-Susan Sun Nunamaker)

Below, is a re-post from a sister publication, Windermere Sun:

(Please click on red links & note magenta)

With the Florida Sun, low cost of solar and improved battery technology, even without pro-solar policies such as renewable portfolio standard or power purchase agreements, Florida currently ranks 12th for cumulative solar capacity installed and is expected to continue to advance its position in light of the dramatic drop in cost of solar and improved battery technology.

Below are data gathered from FLSEIA (Florida Solar Energy Industries Association), on Florida Solar Industry:

  • Solar Installed: 725.1 MW (404.7 MW in 2016)
  • State Homes Powered by Solar: 79,000
  • Percentage of State’s Electricity From Solar: 0.31% (that % keeps increasing)
  • Solar Jobs and Ranking: 8,260 (5th in 2016)
  • Solar Companies in State: 492 companies total; 69 manufacturers, 261 installers/developers, 153 others
  • Total Solar Investment in State: $1,459.85 million ($523.64 million in 2016)
  • Price Declines: 64% over the last 5 years
  • Growth Projections and Ranking: 2,559 MW over next 5 years

Florida Annual Solar Installations between 2010-2017 (with forecast into 2021) (credit: FLSEIA)

For more solar data, click HERE.

Some Notable Solar Installations in Florida, below:

  • Martin Next Generation Solar Energy Center: It is the solar parabolic-trough component of an integrated solar combined cycle 1150 MW plant, in western Martin County, Florida, just north of Indiantown, built by Florida Power & Light Company in 2010, with enough electricity to power 8,216 homes.
  • Several large retailers in Florida have gone solar: 6th Street, Ace Hardware, Bronson and AMJ, Inc., General Growth Properties had installed one of the largest solar installations with 1 MW of solar capacity at their Altamonte Springs location.
  • TIA Solar in Tampa also installed 1 MW of solar capacity in 2016, among the largest solar installations in Florida, with capacity to power more than 175 homes.

Florida State Solar Policy Resources, below:

  • Florida Public Service Commission-(FPSC) regulates investor-owned electric, natural gas, water, and wastewater utilities. In the telecommunications industry, the FPSC facilitates competitive markets, has authority over intercarrier disputes, and oversees pay telephones, the federal Lifeline Assistance Program and Telecommunications Relay Service. The Florida Public Service Commission consists of five members appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. Commissioners serve four-year terms. One commissioner is a designated Chairman, elected by the Commission for a two-year term.The commissioners are Chairman Julie I. Brown, Ronald A. Brisé, Art Graham, Jimmy Patronis, and Donald Polmann. In essence, FPSC learn about the governing body that regulates electricity rates and services of Florida Public Utilities.
  • Florida State Legislature-It is the two houses that act as the state legislature of the U.S. state of Florida. The Florida Constitution states that “The legislative power of the state shall be vested in a legislature of the State of Florida,” composed of a Senate and House of Representatives. The legislature is seated at the Florida State Capitol in Tallahassee. Both chambers have been under Republican control since 1996. The Legislature is composed of 160 state legislators (120 in the House and 40 in the Senate). Members are term-limited to eight consecutive years; however, there is no limit on the total number of terms (after sitting out two years, a member may run again). The state legislature meets beginning in March for a period not to exceed 60 calendar days. Special sessions are called as needed. In essence, FSL track pending legislation affecting solar energy, locate and contact individual legislators, and stay up to date on current legislative issues in Florida.
  • Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services-FDACS is an executive department of the government of Florida.The Commissioner of Agriculture (directly elected by voters statewide for a four-year term, and a member of the Florida Cabinet) is the head of the department. The current commissioner is Adam Putnam. In essence, it finds/provides a wide range of information on state government energy programs, policy, projects, energy-saving strategies and energy-related statistics.
  • Florida Energy System Consortium-The Florida Energy Systems Consortium (FESC) was created by the Florida State government to promote collaboration among the energy experts at its 12 supported universities to share energy-related expertise. The consortium assists the state in the development and implementation of an environmentally compatible, sustainable, and efficient energy strategic plan. The Consortium was charged to ‘perform research and development on innovative energy systems that lead to alternative energy strategies, improved energy efficiencies, and expanded economic development for the state‘. The legislature appropriated funding for research at five of the universities as well as support for education, outreach, and technology commercialization. The Consortium reports to and provides guidance on an as needed basis to the Florida Legislature, Executive Office of the Governor, and the Florida’s Office of Energy housed in the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. In essence, it assists the state in development and implementation of an environmentally compatible, sustainable, and efficient energy strategic plan.
  • DSIRE Incentives Database Florida-It is a comprehensive source of information on state, local, utility,and federal incentives and policies that promote renewable energy and energy efficiency. DSIRE was established in 1995 and funded by the US Department of Energy and is an ongoing project of the North Carolina Solar Center and the Interstate Renewable Energy Council. It is essentially a public clearninghouse for specific solar energy incentives in Florida and across the United States.
  • U.S. Energy Information Administration-Florida State Profile– (EIA) is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System responsible for collecting, analyzing, and disseminating energy information to promote sound policy-making, efficient markets, and public understanding of energy and its interaction with the economy and the environment. EIA programs cover data on coal, petroleum, natural gas, electric, renewable and nuclear energy. EIA is part of the U.S. Department of Energy. It explores official energy statistics, including data on electricity supply and demand from the U.S. government
  • EnergySage Solar Data Explorer-Florida-It reviews the costs and benefits of installing solar panels in Florida, based on real price data from solar quotes.

More posts on solar topics will be coming in our future posts at Windermere Sun.

Photographed, gathered, written, and posted by Windermere Sun-Susan Sun Nunamaker
More about the community at www.WindermereSun.com

We Need Fair Value of Solar

~have a bright and sunny day~

Any comments, suggestions, concerns regarding this post will be welcomed at sunisthefuture@gmail.com

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19 June

Solar & Wind, No Longer The Smallest Kids On The Energy Block

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Dear Friends, Visitors/Viewers/Readers,

(Please click on red links & note magenta)

This is a repost from our sister publication, Windermere Sun, below:

wind surfing (photo by Olga Shevchenko, presented at: WindermereSun.com)

sunset sun rays (photo by Susan Sun Nunamaker, presented at: WindermereSun.com)

wind turbine (photo by Paul Davison, presented at: WindermereSun.com)

solar panels reflecting the sky (photo by: Debbie Mous, presented at: WindermereSun.com)

wind farm (photo by Drew Broadley, presented at: WindermereSun.com)

solar energy (photo by: Alla Leitus, presented at: WindermereSun.com)

Oh my God dis is my favourite 🙂 (photo by kenchu, presented at: WindermereSun.com)

Solar Panels on Space Vehicle (photo by: SpaceX, presented at: WindermereSun.com)

wind energy (photo by Arno Nym, presented at: WindermereSun.com)

solar panels (photo by Rainer Berg, presented at: WindermereSun.com)

windmill (photo by Christophe Grasseau, presented at: WindermereSun.com)

skyscraper solar stone (photo by: Valerij Zhugan, presented at: WindermereSun.com)

windmill (photo by Dora Mitsonia, presented at: WindermereSun.com)

solar (photo by frederico pinto, presented at: WindermereSun.com)

Windermere Blue Sunset (credit: Windermere Sun-Susan Sun Nunamaker)

(Please click on red links & note magenta)

monthly net electricity generation from selected fuels (Jan.-March, 2017, credit: U.S. EIA), presented at: WindermereSun.com

monthly net electricity generation from selected fuels, in % (Jan.-March, 2017, credit: U.S. EIA) presented at: WindermereSun.com

In March of 2017, according to a new U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) report, ten percent of all of the electricity generated in United States came from wind and solar power. This milestone demonstrates that renewable energy are becoming significant source of electricity in U.S. and no longer need to be classified as “alternative” energy. Texas is the biggest wind power producer while California is the largest solar producer in USA.

Below, in italics, is taken from EIA report on June 14, 2017)

For the first time, monthly electricity generation from wind and solar (including utility-scale plants and small-scale systems) exceeded 10% of total electricity generation in the United States, based on March data in EIA’s Electric Power Monthly. Electricity generation from both of these energy sources has grown with increases in wind and solar generating capacity. On an annual basis, wind and solar made up 7% of total U.S. electric generation in 2016.

Electricity generation from wind and solar follows seasonal patterns that reflect the seasonal availability of wind and sunshine. Within the United States, wind patterns vary based on geography. For example, wind-powered generating units in Texas, Oklahoma, and nearby states often have their highest output in spring months, while wind-powered generators in California are more likely to have their highest output in summer months.

Monthly solar output is highest in the summer months, regardless of location, because of the greater number of daylight hours. About half of all utility-scale solar power plants in the United States use some form of sun-tracking technology to improve their seasonal output.

Based on seasonal patterns in recent years, electricity generation from wind and solar will probably exceed 10% of total U.S. generation again in April 2017, then fall to less than 10% in the summer months. Since 2014, when EIA first began estimating monthly, state-level electricity generation from small-scale solar photovoltaic systems, combined wind and solar generation has reached its highest level in either the spring or fall. Because these seasons are times of generally low electricity demand, combined wind and solar generation also reached its highest share of the U.S. total during these times of year.

Based on annual data for 2016, Texas accounted for the largest total amount of wind and solar electricity generation. Nearly all of this generation was from wind, as Texas generates more wind energy than any other state. As a share of the state’s total electricity generation, wind and solar output was highest in Iowa, where wind and solar made up 37% of electricity generation in 2016. In addition to Iowa, wind and solar provided at least 20% of 2016 electricity generation in six other states.

In almost all states, wind makes up a larger share of the state’s total electricity generation than solar. Among the top dozen states, only California and Arizona had more solar generation than wind in 2016. Three states in the top 12—Iowa, Kansas, and North Dakota—had no generation from utility-scale solar plants in 2016 and relatively little output from small-scale solar photovoltaic systems.

EIA analyst Owen Comstock said state renewable goals are one of the biggest reasons how wind and solar are able to reach this milestone. Most states require a certain portion of their electricity to be generated from renweables. States such as California is currently setting its goal to obtain 50% of its electricity from renewables by 2030, and lawmakers in CA are debating about the possibility of expanding that to 100% by 2045.

For those of us in Florida, even without with any government incentive or mandate, due to the dramatic dropping of cost in solar and wind, as long as we pay attention and take actions, we will be on our way to hit the 100% renewables goal before 2045. Based on SEIA (Solar Energy Industries Association), Floridians have installed 725.1 MW solar by 2016 (404.7 MW was installed in 2016). More will be provided in the next post.

 


Photographed, gathered, written, and posted by Windermere Sun-Susan Sun Nunamaker
More about the community at www.WindermereSun.com

Any comments, suggestions, concerns regarding this post will be welcomed at info.WindermereSun@gmail.com

~have a bright and sunny day~

Any comments, suggestions, concerns regarding this post will be welcomed at sunisthefuture@gmail.com

Gathered, written, and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker

We Need Fair Value of Solar

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Please also get into the habit of checking at these sites below for more on solar energy topics:

www.sunisthefuture.net

www.kiva.org/team/sunisthefuture

www.facebook.com/sunisthefuture

www.pinterest.com/sunisthefuture

www.youtube.com/user/sunisthefuture

www.cafepress.com/sunisthefuture

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Please also get into the habit of checking at these sites below for more on solar energy topics:

www.sunisthefuture.net

www.kiva.org/team/sunisthefuture

www.facebook.com/sunisthefuture

www.pinterest.com/sunisthefuture

www.youtube.com/user/sunisthefuture

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20 December

Need Funding? Stage Is Set For Renewable and Solar Energy Projects!

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Dear Friends, Visitors/Viewers/Readers,

Below is a repost from one of our sister publications, Windermere Sun:

Sun Rays (credit: Windermere Sun-Susan Sun Nunamaker)

December 19, 2011- Kyle Travis, left and Jon Jackson, with Lighthouse Solar, install microcrystalline PV modules on top of Kevin Donovan’s town home. (Photo by Dennis Schroeder)

 

Windermere Blue Sunset (credit: Windermere Sun-Susan Sun Nunamaker)
 

(Please click on red links & note magenta)

The stage is set. The time is ripe. With the cost of both solar and wind having dropped tremendously in the past three years, solar technology having enabled greater efficiency, the incoming Tesla’s Powerwall, Powerpack solving the storage problem,  and  Tesla’s integrated and cost effective solar roof… the inevitable Solar-Renewable Tsunami is knocking on our door. Astute green investors and lenders could all hear the knock and are ready to finance solar energy projects and fund power developments of renewable-sustainable energy resources. In the U.S., a mix of federal production tax credits and individual state renewable portfolio standards (RPS) are definitely pushing the market. To better understand various policies and incentives for renewables and efficiency by states, please click HERE. For example, state of  CA has 187 such policies and incentives whereas state of FL has 77. Of course the incentives of some of the E.U. nations are also fueling the market. But most importantly, it is the simple fact that the cost of solar  have dropped so much that it is now a more secure investment than putting one’s money in the bank (bank has a rate of return of about 0.8%-1.1% without inflation protection whereas investing in solar provides a rate of return ranging from about 3% (in AK without any tax credit or incentive, it is 4.4% with tax credit and incentives) to 24.4% (in HI with tax credit and incentives, location-climate-incentive dependent, and this is with inflation protection).

For a simple Solar Investment Payback Formula:

  • Total System Cost/Value of Electricity Generated/Your Annual Electricity Usage = Payback Time
  •  1/Payback Time = Rate of Return on Investment

This means:

  • a 6 kW grid-tied system that costs about $10,000 (subject to market fluctuation, excluding fees and incentives)
  • The average American household uses 10,932 kWh of electricity per year (source: EIA)
  • They pay an average of $0.12 per kWh for it

Therefore, using American national averages:  $10,000 system price/$0.12 per kWh/10932 kWh per year = 7.62 years = Payback Time

Therefore,  1/Payback Time = 1/7.62 =0.13 1  or 13.1% = Rate of Return on Solar Investment, keep in mind that this is with inflation protection (utility bills are always going up).

At this point, I’d like to share with you all a site that had already done the work for you, state by state, Solar Power Rocks., in figuring out the Investment Return (IRR), with consideration of respective state’s tax credits and incentives.

As a result, there are much opportunities for high yielding rates of return on investment in solar as well as other green renewable sources. In the coming decades, there will be so much transformational developments waiting to be planned out and completed. If you have a project ($multi-million project) in mind, with a plan but insufficient funding, please contact me via: info.WindermereSun@gmail.com so Windermere Sun may be able to introduce you and your plan/project to potential investors/lenders. If you are an angel investor, potential investor or lender for solar projects, please feel free to contact me at: info.WindermereSun@gmail.com so we can spread the sunshine globally while saving our planet earth!

Investment Criteria for Joint Venture Financing: financing for all types of commercial real estate and alternative energy projects. In general, they must meet the following criteria: • The project 5% down or more; • The project must be shovel-ready–defined as ready to break ground in 90 days or less; • The project must be sponsored by an experienced developer with a significant financial stake. • Asset-based loans, including In-Ground Assets; • Corporate expansion loans; • International Funding; and • Hard money loans. Joint Venture Financing Project Types: (NEW DEVELOPMENT ONLY) • Hotel Resorts and Casinos • Assisted Living/Senior Housing • Apartment Buildings/Multifamily Housing • Alternative/Renewable Energy (i.e., solar, wind, hydro, geothermal, etc.) • Green Energy (i.e., biofuel/biodiesel, biomass, waste-to-energy, etc.) • Hospitals and Health Care Facilities • Infrastructure (roads, highways, rail, etc.) • College and University Buildings • Public-Use and Recreational Facilities • Industrial Projects • Other Related Types Locations: USA and International, Joint Venture Financing Terms: • 95% equity financing • Typically three to five year term • Non-recourse financing • No interest payments during term of investment • Minority equity stake in lieu of interest • Take out with permanent financing or sale Time to Closing: 90 to 120 days.

May we all have many many bright and sunny days.

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~have a bright and sunny day~

 

Any comments, suggestions, concerns regarding this post will be welcomed at sunisthefuture@gmail.com

Gathered, written, and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker
Please also get into the habit of checking at these sites below for more on solar energy topics:

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www.kiva.org/team/sunisthefuture

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4 August

Solar Is Preferred For Water Conservation

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Solar PV is the major solution for avoiding water-related conflicts (credit: sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker)

 

(Please click on red links and note magenta)

In addition to our Aug. 2, 2014 post, there is another important reason that we prefer Solar Energy use: it is critical in avoiding water-related conflicts.

In a new CNA report, A Clash of Competing Necessities (Water Adequacy and Electric Reliability in China, India, France, and Texas), PV is being identified as the major solution for avoiding water-related conflicts. The first solution is energy efficiency, moving from coal to using PV, wind, and natural gas, according to this report. The Director of Energy, Water and Climate at the CNA Think Tank‘s Institute for Public Research, Paul Faeth, says he is very surprised that water conservation is not “part of the sales pitch” for PV. The dramatic drop in prices for solar is making it a cost effective solution to water scarcity, he added.

An estimated 40% of all freshwater withdrawal in the U.S. is being used for thermal cooling, in order for power generation to remain safe and stable. As energy demand, economic and population growth, and climate change  place more strain on water access, there have been/are/will be scrutinising water use in the power sector by competing necessities. Thermal power generation is heavily dependent on water use: Faeth describes the growing concern  of plants having to power down or completely shut down in drought and heat waves.

The report indicated that for water being removed for the process of thermal cooling and being put back into the local environment, or “withdrawal”, the water use by different energy sources are as follow:

  • coal with carbon capture and storage (CSS) uses 4.3 cubic meters per MWh
  • nuclear uses 4.2 cubic meters per MWh
  • coal alone uses 2.3 cubic meters per MWh
  • natural gas uses 1 cubic meters per MWh
  • wind uses zero cubic meters per MWh
  • solar PV uses 0.1 cubic meters per MWh  (solar PV uses a small amount of water for washing the panels once in a while, but none for power generation)

For ‘consumption’ of water, whereby water is completely removed from the local environment,

  • coal with carbon capture and storage (CSS) uses 3.2 cubic meters per MWh
  • nuclear uses 2.5 cubic meters per MWh
  • coal alone uses 1.9 cubic meters per MWh
  • natural gas uses 0.7 cubic meters per MWh
  • wind uses zero cubic meters per MWh
  • solar PV uses 0.1 cubic meters per MWh

According to Faeth, policy for water conservation for the power sector and energy efficiency doesn’t exist at the moment. “Water concerns for policy makers and for many people are also a higher priority than climate change,” he said, “in drought it doesn’t matter what the cause of drought is you still have to respond, and if you can respond in a way that is cost effective and mitigates emissions, such as using wind and PV, then that is a real plus.”

The report uses figures from the US Energy Information Administration (EIA) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), focusing on China, India, France, and Texas as case studies, since there are already challenges in power generation and water scarcity in these regions. China has high agriculture demand (second only to U.S.) and relies heavily on coal, requiring water for cooling, is already experiencing blackouts from a lack of water for cooling. India already uses 1.3 billion cubic meters of water per year, with forecast of 7 billion by 2040. “You have to wonder if that is even possible,” said Faeth. Solar is inexpensive in India and is a cost effective way to reduce water conflicts. Faeth added, “If water is taken from agriculture, it would be politically untenable….India has to start doing something else to avoid water competition that is already happening and we expect to get worse.”

In India 52% of the population live in water scarce areas, with 73% of electricity generation located in water stressed areas, with frequent blackouts.  Currently 79% of newly built capacity is scheduled for construction where the water supply is under threat.

In 2003, a heat wave in France lost 4 GW of nuclear and hydro energy, causing France to restrict its electricity exports, definitely reflecting its energy insecurity for its European importers. In 2009, France used 64% of its (withdrawn) water for thermal cooling due to its 80% nuclear energy generation, this presents a unique threat to energy security during droughts. Energy demand in France is expected to grow by 28% by the 2040s. France’s reliance on nuclear energy means even modest growth is a concern for water scarcity.

Current drought in Texas has already taken water from farmers to avoid blackouts. The case is now in the U.S. court. The report indicated that Texas is likely to meet water and energy demand from new PV, wind, natrual gas, and energy efficiency, despite the challenges due to drought. But the state needs to avoid new coal generation. Texas is now “looking to do more wind and PV, not particularly for climate change mitigation but because these strategies can save water,” said Faeth.

Gathered, written, and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker

Any of your questions/comments/suggestions will be welcomed at sunisthefuture@gmail.com

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12 August

Updates About FIT (Feed-In-Tariff) & From SEIA

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Dear Friends, Visitors/Viewers/Readers,

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Please show your support for Renewable Energy by visiting-signing-sharing Renewable-FIT For Sunshine State!

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I just want to add one comment to the email below: FIT (Feed-In-Tariff) and various modified FIT programs would actually be more fair and even more effective than the net metering system. Allow me to present to you some updates on FIT and similar programs at Feed-In-Tariffs and Similar Programs (made available by U.S. Energy Information Administration)

Below, you will find the recent press release from SEIA (in italics):

Sun Shines Through (photographed by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker)

America’s Solar Industry Looks to Play Key Role in Grid Modernization

Washington, D.C. – Reacting to a new report issued today by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the White House Council of Economic Advisors, the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA) says its members are well-positioned to assist efforts to modernize the U.S. electric grid and to make it more resilient in the future when pounded by severe weather.

SEIA President and CEO Rhone Resch released the following statement after the report’s release:

“Ten years after the largest blackout in U.S. history, which blanketed eight states in the Northeast in the summer of 2003 and left 50 million Americans in the dark, solar is more important than ever to our nation’s energy security and grid reliability. We look forward to working with the White House, DOE and Congress to leverage ways that solar can add to the grid’s resiliency and overall long-term effectiveness.

“As more and more nuclear and coal plants are mothballed, America’s solar energy industry is doing its part to make up for some of that lost generating capacity. Today, more than 30 utility-scale, clean energy solar projects are under construction, putting thousands of electricians, steelworkers and laborers to work and helping to reduce carbon emissions from power plants. These facilities, along with rooftop solar on homes, businesses and schools, will generate electricity for generations to come. In fact, by the end of next year, distributed generation from residences alone is expected to top 3,000 megawatts (MW) for the first time ever.

“All totaled, there is now more than 8,500 MW of cumulative solar electric capacity installed in the U.S. – enough to power more than 1.3 million American homes. What’s more, in the first quarter of 2013, more than 48 percent all new electricity added to the grid was solar. In addition, innovative solar heating and cooling systems are offering American consumers cost-efficient, effective options for meeting their energy needs.

“Today, solar employs nearly 120,000 Americans at more than 5,600 companies, most of which are small businesses spread across the United States, making solar one of the fastest growing industries in America. Part of this amazing growth is attributed to the fact that the cost of a solar system has dropped by nearly 40 percent over the past two years, making solar more affordable than ever.

“Simply put, solar is critically important to our nation’s energy security and national security – and we’re doing our part to fight climate change, too. By anyone’s standards, that’s a win-win for America.”

###

About SEIA:
Established in 1974, the Solar Energy Industries Association® is the national trade association of the U.S. solar energy industry. Through advocacy and education, SEIA® is building a strong solar industry to power America. As the voice of the industry, SEIA works with its 1,000 member companies to make solar a mainstream and significant energy source by expanding markets, removing market barriers strengthening the industry and educating the public on the benefits of solar energy. Visit SEIA online at www.seia.org.

~have a bright and sunny day~

gathered, written, and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker

Any of your comments will be welcomed below or via sunisthefuture@gmail.com (please note if you do not want your email to be shared)

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15 February

Carmine A. Tilghman of Tucson Electric Power Helps Us To Use More Solar Energy !

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Dear Friends, Visitors/Viewers/Readers,

(Please click on red links below)

There are still more valuable interviews to be shared with you from my trip up to the Philadelphia, PA last week. Today’s post is an interview with Carmine A. Tilghman, Director of Renewable Resources & Programs at Tucson Electric Power, during PV America East 2013, in Pennsylvania Convention Center of Philadelphia, PA.

Mr. Tilghman commented on how Tucson Electric Power (a  UniSource Energy Company) worked collaboratively with University of Arizona, Arizona Research Institute for Solar Energy (aka AzRISE), and various other entities for grant opportunities (such as IBM and other universities, research institutes and developers). Such collaboration is very instrumental in promoting solar and renewable energy use to the next level. He also mentioned a recent “leasing model” that addresses the main concern or challenge of consumers in dealing with cost effectiveness of implementing solar energy. Furthermore, the dramatic drop in cost of solar energy makes it much more affordable for every one. Therefore, the larger integration of distributed generation as well as utility scale projects will continue to provide plenty of opportunities and challenges to utility companies. As the utilities move forward to meet the various RPS standard in different states, utilities will continue to operate the grid while meeting reliability criteria and providing the reliable service enjoyed by consumers. Some challenges faced by installers or developers, such as regulatory uncertainty, back lash, or recession have been overcome.

Some clarification for RPS (Renewable Portfolio Standard): it is state requirement for regulated utilities to have specified fraction of their electricity from renewable energy sources. Not all 50 states have RPS (I know FL does not have one whereas 37 states already have either RPS standards (mandatory) or Goals (voluntary). Please refer to the map provided by U.S. Energy Information Administration for states with RPS.

Mr. Tilghman mentioned that AZ RPS is based on certain percentage of sales for each of the regulated utilities, with expectation of 15% renewables by 2025. AZ RPS started its infancy in 2000, then through public process, corporation commission hearings, was designed in 2006 and finally implemented in 2007. This lengthy process was well worth it for the state of AZ. In five years, AZ Public Service (largest investor in utility serving greater Phoenix area) as well as Tucson Electric Power & UNS Electric Inc. have all reached beyond the minimum requirement set by AZ RPS. Mr. Tilghman observes that implementation of distributed generation programs, when successfully implemented (as has been the case in AZ), solar installations will continue without any incentives. On behalf of Tucson Electric Power, Mr. Tilghman expresses their acceptance in meeting the challenge in moving forward to renewable energy and have demonstrated their success and willingness in sharing their trials and tribulations with other utility companies throughout USA.

Any states or utility companies interested in learning more about lessons learned from the process of obtaining AZ RPS or successfully integrating distributed generation into the utility or grid, please feel free to contact Mr. Carmine A. Tilghman of Tucson Electric Power via ctilghman@tep.com

Thank you, Mr. Tilghman, for sharing your experience with our viewers/visitor.

~have a bright and sunny day~
Interviewed, written, and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker, sunisthefuture@gmail.com
Any of your comments/suggestions/ questions are welcomed.
Homepage:  http://www.sunisthefuture.net


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