Posts Tagged ‘French’

14 June

Trains, Powered By Sunshine, in Belgium and India

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Dear Friends, Visitors/Viewers/Readers,

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The Swiss Solar Impulse 2 (solar airplane) and French solar rooftops have inspired me to look toward other forms of transport and surface areas to be powered by or used to generate solar energy. It’s fantastic that there had been quite a few interesting progress made in the area of trains. Case in point, the high speed train powered by solar energy, in the video below, was in service back in 2011 in Belgium:

The rail line between Antwerp and Amsterdam (about 80 miles) in Belgium was the first solar paneled train tunnel (about 2.2 mile long tunnel) in Europe that utilized 16,000 solar panels (costed $22 million for installation) to power the railway infrastructure and trains back in June (started on June 14), of 2011, bringing clean energy to trains. This Solar Tunnel project is expected to generate 3.3 megawatts of energy (equivalent of the average annual electricity consumption for 4,000 trains or about 1,000 homes). The project partner Enfinity also indicated that the tunnel is decreasing CO2 emissions by 2,400 tons annually. “It is the perfect way to cut the carbon footprint because the spaces used have no other economic value,” commented by Bart Van Renterghem, Enfinity former UK head. Other collaborators on this project were Belgium rail operator Infrabel and solar construction company Solar Power Systems.  This was a fantastic clean energy project because it is optimizing the previously idled space and once the installation is in place, there is to be no consumption of fuel or coal and at no cost to our environment.

About 4461 miles (or 7179 km) away, India is planning to massively  utilize the solar energy via its state-owned railway systems. With one of the largest railway networks in the world, running about 12,000 trains, 23 million passengers (practically the entire Australian population), and 3 million tonnes of freight daily, much energy is needed.   In 2012, the Indian Railways consumed nearly 3 million kiloliters of diesel oil  and about 14 billion kWh of electricity .  So, India’s railway minister Suresh Prabhakar Prabhu wants to control such a ballooning fuel bill by shifting toward alternative energy sources. Since the Indian Railway System is aiming to have at least 10% of its total energy consumption coming from renewable energy by 2020, the railway minister wants to incorporate more alternative energy sources to power trains. This is first done by solar powered lighting via solar panels mounted on the roofs of the trains. This is now being tested on a non-AC coach on the RewariSitapur passenger train.

Indian Solar Train photographed by Anil Kumar Chhatri or credit citymetric.com

Indian Solar Train photographed by Anil Kumar Chhatri or credit citymetric.com

The cost of installing panels on each coach is about Rs3.9 lakh (about $6,084), translating into savings of Rs1.24 lakh (about $1,934) per year, According to The Economic Times of India Times.  In the next few weeks, the Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru, and the railway coach maker Integral Coach Factory will  be testing the solar  paneled coach under a variety of conditions. Besides the solar powered coach, the Indian Railways will also be building  solar power plants of about 8.8 MW (megawatts) in 200 train stations and some of its office buildings.

Without the common vision and collaborations from policy makers, such ambitious projects would not have existed. In India, it took the echoing  support between India’s prime minister Narendra Modi and railway minister Suresh Prabhakar Prabhu to enable such a solar project to become a reality.  Prime Minister Modi encouraged alternative energy projects by encouraging solar companies from around the world to invest $100 billion to reach its solar power capacity target of 100,000 MW by 2022 (about five times India’s current solar power generation capacity). He was also instrumental behind another ambitious project, World’s First Canal Solar Power Plant in India, in Gujarat, in one of our previous post.

I hope all policy makers and governing bodies will receive the support he/she/they/it need(s) during this critical transitional period in human history, onward and forward toward the renewable/solar energy future! For deep down, within all of our hearts, we know that Solar/Renewable/Clean Energy is the solution/answer to Energy-Pollution-Economic Prosperity-International Conflicts. The sooner we get there, the better it will be for us and our posterity. In our system of democracy, perhaps all of us may be able to help play a part in assisting our policy makers in arriving at the correct decisions or policies quickly.

~have a bright and sunny day~

Gathered, written, and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker

Any comments and suggestions are welcomed at sunisthefuture@gmail.com

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25 July

News On FIT (Feed-In-Tariff)

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Dear Friends, Visitors/Viewers/Readers,

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Thanks to our friend from the Wind Persuasion, Paul Gipe, keeping us updated on the subject of FIT (Feed-In-Tariff), below I’d like to share an excerpt of the email from Paul:

Solar Energy (credit: Dennis Schroeder, pv powered townhome)

News on Feed-in Tariffs

July 22, 2013,   by Leah Stokes

The feed-in tariff was working, renewable energy projects were being built, jobs were being created and climate change was being addressed.

July 22, 2013,   by Bernard Chabot

French energy expert Bernard Chabot explains how easy it is to properly design feed-in tariffs, especially for solar, and proposes “advanced feed-in tariffs.”

July 22, 2013,   by Craig Morris

Spain remains in the news with further changes to its feed-in tariffs. We spoke with Berlin-based Canadian analyst Toby Couture to go beyond the headline that “Spain has thrown out feed-in tariffs.”

July 21, 2013,   by Brian Wang

A price of RMB0.43 will be paid for each kilowatt-hour generated by new Chinese nuclear power plants, according to a ruling by the National Development and Reform Commission intended to incentivise construction. This equates to $70/MWh.

July 18, 2013,   by Paul Gipe

While municipal utilities in Los Angeles and on New York’s Long Island plod along with timid municipal feed-in tariff programs, Thailand plans to add 1,000 MW of solar photovoltaics (solar PV) by the end of 2014.[more]

 

~have a bright and sunny day~

gathered and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker

Any of your comments will be welcomed below or via sunisthefuture@gmail.com (please note if you do not want your email to be shared)

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12 April

French Areva & Indian Reliance Will Work On 250 MW CSP in India, the Largest in Asia !

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Dear Readers,

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If you are in favor of renewable,  clean, or solar energy, please sign this petition for FIT/CLEAN Program, accessible at http://sunisthefuture.net/?page_id=1065 Thank you very much.
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Dear Readers & Friends,

This just came down the wire: The Indian energy group Reliance has awarded the French multinational Areva a contract to build the two  125 MW (so total of 250 MW) Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) plants in Rajasthan (in northwestern India), using the French company’s Compact Linear Fresnel Reflector (CLFR) technology.  This 250 MW CSP project in India is scheduled to come online in May of 2013 and will be the largest of its kind in Asia.  The first phase of the project has already begun and it will represent a reduction of around 557,000 tons of CO2 emissions annually compared with a coal-fired plant, according to Areva. India aims to build an additional 20 GW of solar capacity by 2022.  The chief executive of Reliance Power JP Chalasani hinted that this may/will be the first of many solar projects to be built by the two companies, “Today’s announcement is just the beginning. We look forward to working with Areva in helping to meet India’s clean energy goals through this project.”  CLFR (Compact Linear Fresnel Reflector) technology uses reflected sunlight to heat liquid-filled tubes which generate high-pressure steam that produces electricity via turbines. The CLFR solar steam generators are simple, durable, and scalable, and relatively quick to install;they are also able to generate 1.5- to 3-times more power per acre of land than other competing solar technologies, making CLFR solar steam generators the most land-efficient renewable energy technology in operation now. Here is a short video clip on how Areva Solar’s Compact Linear Fresnel Reflector (CLFR) solar steam generators can augment fossil-fired power plants without added emissions, below:

This Reliance contract with Areva solidifies Areva Solar’s position as a leading global supplier of CSP (Concentrated Solar Plant) for large-scale standalone power plants, power augmentation of fossil-fired power plants and solar hybrid applications. Areva has about 500MW of CSP capacity in operation under construction in advance development at the moment. The deal with Reliance is part of a major push by the French engineering company Areva to set up its activities in the solar sector around the world: in Australia, it has been contracted to build a 44 MW solar thermal in addition to the coal-fired Kogan Creek power station;in USA,it has secured a partnership with Tucson Electric Power to develop a solar augmentation project in Arizona.  Apparently solar is not the only area of Areva’s interest; just days before, Areva had won a key deal to supply turbines to a 500 MW offshore wind project in northern France;Areva will also produce 100 of its 5 MW turbines at a new factory in the French port of Le Havre through a working partnership with Spanish utility Iberdrola and UK’s wind developer RES.  Yes, one can see that solar and renewable energy world are full of efforts through cooperation and that Areva will be leaving much of its renewable energy footprints throughout our planet earth.

~have a bright and sunny day~

Gathered, written, and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker

Any comments and suggestions are welcomed at sunisthefuture@gmail.com

Please also get into the habit of checking at these sites below for more on solar energy topics:

www.sunisthefuture.net

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