Posts Tagged ‘IREC’

7 March

More on Value of Solar Talk By Karl Rabago in Boulder, Colorado

Share

Dear Friends, Visitors/Viewers/Readers,

Sun rays final Sun rays through leaves2 final

 (Please click on red links & note magenta)

This is a continuation from the previous post, by Karl Rabago, on the Value of Solar, in Boulder, Colorado. This talk explores many issues associated within solar industry and is very timely and relevant. With more than 25 years of experience in policy and regulation, energy market and energy technology development, Karl Rabago brings us in-depth insight. He now operates an energy consulting practice, Rabago Energy LLC, providing strategic policy, regulatory and market development consulting in the clean and innovative energy sectors. He is serving as the Chair of the Center for Resource Solutions, a San Francisco-based non-governmental organization that advances voluntary clean energy markets, and sits on the Board of the Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). Without further ado,  Karl Rabago in Boulder, CO, talks about Value of Solar, Beyond Value of Solar (where Value of 4S’s-Storage, Smarts, Security, Savings), and Ideal Distributed Solar Tariff are also discussed, below:


Now for the Q & A session after Karl’s talk, below:

 

~have a bright and sunny day~
Any comments, suggestions, concerns regarding this post will be welcomed at sunisthefuture@gmail.com

Gathered, written, photographed, and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker
Please also get into the habit of checking at these sites below for more on solar energy topics:

www.sunisthefuture.net

www.kiva.org/team/sunisthefuture

www.facebook.com/sunisthefuture

www.pinterest.com/sunisthefuture

www.youtube.com/user/sunisthefuture

www.cafepress.com/sunisthefuture

HTML adl

Google+

Windermere Sun website Header small

 

Share
20 June

ANSI/IREC Standard 14732:2014 Is Here!

Share

Dear Friends, Visitors/Viewers/Readers,

ANSI/IREC Standard 14732:2014

 

(Please click on red links below)

Contact: Laure-Jeanne Davignon

email: laurejeanne@irecusa.org

 

IREC Clean Energy Certificate Standard Approved by ANSI

as an American National Standard

June 20, 2014 – A new national standard for the accreditation of clean energy education/training certificate programs, developed by the Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC), has received final approval from the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) as an American National Standard. IREC was accredited by ANSI in 2013 as a standards developing organization, leading the nation in clean energy education/training credentials and standards.

 

“We’re very proud to receive this recognition from ANSI,” said IREC President/CEO Jane Weissman. “It demonstrates that IREC has exemplified best practices, and truly listened to all sectors of industry in developing these requirements. A program accredited to this national, consensus-based standard distinguishes itself as meeting high-quality education and training requirements that were developed with significant industry input – so the skills of graduates match the needs of clean energy jobs.”

 

ANSI/IREC Standard 14732-2014 was developed by an independent, subject matter expert working group of the IREC Standards Committee, working closely with industry leaders so that the standard is aligned with specific job task analysis, and linked to real-world skills needed by individuals entering the clean energy workforce. Certificate programs that apply for accreditation under the standard may be hosted by a variety of institutions, including colleges, industry training groups, for-profit organizations, or unions.

“Workforce education is so crucial to the development of our industry, and we saw that folks were confused by the proliferation of ‘green’ certificates,” said Laure-Jeanne Davignon, director of the IREC Credentialing Program. “IREC wanted a means for prospective students, employers and ultimately consumers to identify high quality clean energy certificate programs that prepare graduates with market-valued skills needed by industry.”

The IREC Standards Committee and the working groups who develop and revise IREC’s standards help to ensure industry validation and acceptance.

“With IREC, the Standards Committee would like to thank all of the stakeholders who participated in the vital process of developing a consensus-based standard,” said Standards Committee Chair Sydney Roberts, of Southface Energy Institute. “With this ANSI/IREC Standard, IREC continues to show leadership in building the workforce of renewable energy and energy efficiency professionals.”

For questions about IREC’s standards development activities: credentialing@irecusa.org, or call (518) 621-7379.

Download ANSI/IREC Standard 14732 (PDF 636 KB)


About IREC
The Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC) is a non-profit organization accelerating the use of renewable energy and energy efficiency since 1982.  Its programs and policies lead to easier, more affordable connection to the utility grid; fair credit for renewable energy produced; best practices for states, municipalities, utilities and industries. IREC is a respected resource and national leader in quality assessment, workforce development, consumer protection and stakeholder coordination. Since 2005, IREC has provided a foundation for the growing clean energy workforce through the credentialing of trainers and training programs and through the development of quality standards. As of June 2013, IREC is an accredited American National Standards Developer. For more information, visit http://www.irecusa.org

~have a bright and sunny day~

Gathered and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker

Any of your questions/comments/suggestions will be welcomed at sunisthefuture@gmail.com

Please also get into the habit of checking at these sites below for more on solar energy topics:

www.sunisthefuture.net

www.instagram.com/sunisthefuture

www.pinterest.com/sunisthefuture

www.facebook.com/sunisthefuture

www.youtube.com/user/sunisthefuture

www.kiva.org/team/sunisthefuture

www.sunisthefuture.com

Homepage: http://www.sunisthefuture.net HTML adl

Google+

Share
21 February

Shaping Our Future With Clean Energy

Share

Dear Friends, Visitors/Viewers/Readers, (Please click on red links below)

Good news!

Florida Sun (Credit: sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker)

Washington, D.C. (February 21, 2014)-The Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC) joined 20 other national business organizations yesterday to share plans to ensure students and workers have the knowledge and skills they need to work in the modern economy. Convened by ACT Foundation and the Business Roundtable, the newly formed National Network of Business and Industry Associations is coordinating cross-sector efforts to close the “skills gap.”

“As an inaugural member of the National Network of Business  and Industry Associations, IREC brings to this multi-industry agenda the ability to share experience, insight and best practices from the renewable energy and energy efficiency sector, and to learn from other industries,” said IREC President and CEO Jane Weissman. “A quality workforce trained to meet industry standards is a foundational lynchpin for market growth.”

As a national standards developer and credentialing organization, IREC is a leader in clean energy workforce development. “We are working with industry and education and training organizations across the country to ensure that quality training matches skills with current and future clean energy jobs,” adds Weissman. “We are excited to partner with this strong inaugural group on such a critical national initiative.”

“Business, educators and job trainers must align their efforts to make sure workers have the skills they need for the jobs of today and tomorrow,” said John Engler, president of the Business Roundtable, an operational partner of the National Network. “Everyone here agrees that it is no longer enough to describe and quantify the gap.  It is time to get to work to close it for good.”

U.S. employers are finding it increasingly difficult to find skilled candidates to fill open jobs, creating the “skills gap.” A June 2013 report by the Georgetown Center on Education and the Workforce, for example, projected that 2.6 million jobs in science, technology, engineering and math will need to be filled between 2010 and 2020.

With an explosion of U.S. solar-related jobs in 2013 – now 142,000, up 20 percent from 2012 – the need is more profound than ever to ensure quality clean energy education and training.

The National Network represents major business sectors and is funded through a collaborative partnership of ACT Foundation, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Joyce Foundation and Lumina Foundation. Members include leaders in the manufacturing, retail, healthcare, energy, construction, hospitality, transportation and information technology sectors. They represent the source of nearly 75 percent of projected U.S. job growth through 2020 (an estimated 30 million new jobs).

At yesterday’s meeting, members discussed efforts to:

  • Create a blueprint of the knowledge, skills, abilities and competencies required for career success in core business sectors;
  • Define the standards for national credentials that validate those skills; and
  • Identify successful models that integrate industry-recognized credentials into secondary and postsecondary education.

“It is encouraging to see the business community unify across industry and sector lines to produce actionable solutions to close the ‘skills gap,’ especially with the power of the Business Roundtable behind them,” said Parminder K. Jassal, founding executive director, ACT Foundation, which co-operates the National Network.

 

Inaugural Members of the National Network of Business and Industry Associations

Aerospace Industries Association

American Health Information Management Association

American Hotel & Lodging Educational Institute

American Land Title Association and ALTA’s Land Title Institute

American Moving and Storage Association

American Public Transportation Association

American Welding Society

Center for Energy Workforce Development

CompTIA

Home Builders Institute

Interstate Renewable Energy Council

The Manufacturing Institute

National Apartment Association Education Institute

National Center for Construction Education and Research

National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence

National Institute for Metalworking Skills

National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation

National Retail Federation Foundation

Paraprofessional Healthcare Institute

TechAmerica/TechAmerica Foundation

Western Association of Food Chains

 

About IREC

IREC believes clean energy is critical to achieving a sustainable and economically strong future. To pave this clean energy path, IREC works to expand consumer access to clean energy; generates information and objective analysis grounded in best practices and standards; and leads programs to build a quality clean energy workforce, including a unique credentialing program for training programs and instructors. A not-for-profit organization since 1982, IREC’s programs and policies have benefitted energy consumers, policymakers, utilities and the clean energy industry. As of July 2013, IREC is an accredited American National Standards Developer. For more information, visit http://www.irecusa.org

 

~have a bright and sunny day~

Gathered and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker

Any of your comments/suggestions/questions will be welcomed at sunisthefuture@gmail.com

Please also get into the habit of checking at these sites below for more on solar energy topics:

www.sunisthefuture.net

www.instagram.com/sunisthefuture

www.pinterest.com/sunisthefuture

www.facebook.com/sunisthefuture

www.youtube.com/user/sunisthefuture

www.kiva.org/team/sunisthefuture

www.sunisthefuture.com

Homepage: http://www.sunisthefuture.net HTML adl Google+

Share
4 January

Expanded Discussion on Value of Solar

Share

Dear Friends, Visitors/Viewers/Readers, (Please click on red links below)

Capturing The Sun (Credit: sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker). This design may also be found at www.sunisthefuture.com

After posting the interview with Karl R. Rabago regarding The Value of Solar, some of the viewers’ /readers’/visitors’ questions made me realize that I needed to summarize the two articles I have linked to in the post in more details.   I apologize, because Mr. Karl R. Rabago did such a fantastic job in presenting the topic of The Value of Solar, I did not want to detract any attention from the interview. But, as long as we do have visitors/viewers who would like to be reading synopsis on the topic in addition to viewing the video, I’d be happy to oblige. I also found out that Youtube seems to be having some storage issue with regard to the video interview with Mr. Karl R. Rabago momentarily. Please be patient and Youtube is working on the issue at the moment. So be sure to check back at the post of Jan. 1, 2014 for the interview with Karl R. Rabago for the video interview later. In The ‘Value Of Solar’ Rate: Designing An Improved Residential Solar Tariff , authored by Karl R. Rabago,  Net metering is a law derived from PURPA (Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act) passed in 1978 such that the original struggle for net metering was the fight to remove the screw, therefore allowing the meter to spin backward so customers could get credit or self-generate (being allowed to make their own electricity through solar energy or generator system) and receive a fair price (otherwise known as the avoided cost) from the utility company for the excess energy being fed back into the grid. This straight forward (use of a single meter with no separate calculation) policy was adopted in 43 states. Although elegantly simple, net metering has its limitations: the assigned retail value for local solar energy is not necessarily reflective of the true value of solar. For example:

  1. There is no distinction between energy due to consumption vs. energy that is excess to consumption during the netting period.
  2. There is no provision for ensuring that the utility recovers the full cost of serving the solar customer.
  3. Much reduced payment for excess generation at the “avoided cost” tends to incentivize solar customers to size solar systems at their baseline energy demand, therefore not fully optimizing the potential in generating valuable excess on-peak or near-peak energy for the network, leaving the utility still having to procure energy for other customers at a higher-than-average cost.
  4. The tiered rate structure of net metering: the more energy a customer uses, the more value that customer receives for solar generation. The traditional net metering coupling solar energy value to the level of a customer’s energy consumption, even in the absence of tiered structure, has the effect of discouraging energy efficiency and encouraging on-peak consumption. When a unit of energy offset by solar generation is worth much more to a customer than a unit of excess generation, the economic signal to the customers is out of sync with other policy and economic objectives.

The Austin Energy of Texas has taken on the task of redesigning the net metering structure. The resulting new Value of Solar residential solar rate is splendid! It has two basic components:

  1. The annually updated value of solar calculation is essentially the price at which the utility is neutral to the solar energy
  2. The value of solar ensures that the utility recovers its full cost of serving the solar customer before any credit for solar generation is applied.

These two components result in a residential solar rate that is more fair to the solar customer, the utility,  and other utility customers.  This also decouples solar energy compensation from both consumption and incentives while being administratively simple. Austin Energy developed a Value of Solar calculation, generating a 30-year levelized value of solar in cents per kilowatt-hour, based on five components:

  1. energy
  2. capacity
  3. transmission capacity
  4. transmission and distribution losses
  5. environmental value

Energy and capacity value make up the bulk of the value and are heavily influenced by natural gas prices. Environmental value is derived from the price premium for Austin Energy’s GreenChoice renewable energy product offering. End result, the Value of Solar rate is about three cents higher than the average residential energy rate. The goal of the calculation is to estimate the total value of a unit of solar energy generated in the distribution grid, or near the point of consumption. That is, the utility would have to buy some energy, including some capacity value such that it would have to be transmitted, with losses, over a delivery system, and pay transmission costs and system charges, and finally with some kind of renewable energy credit or certificate. The calculation if rather conservative for it does not include externality values related to local economic benefits, local environmental benefits or other valuable attributes of distributed solar. Such levelized value needs to be re-evaluated annually so to adjust up-to-date  utility costs and prevent overpayments when system prices fall, not to mention the changing fuel factor. This new Value of Solar rate is expected to reduce the simple payback period for customers, provides stronger incentive for customers to use energy efficiently, and leads to more  on-peak energy available to the utility. Of course, annual recalculations would ensure that both customer and utility are treated fairly as the market costs change. Furthermore, the netting methodology ensures that utility would recover its cost of serving the customer and eliminates the argument that other customers subsidize solar. Austin Energy’s Value of Solar rate was implemented on Oct. 1, 2012 and had already earned recognition and interest from utilities and solar experts. For example, SEPA (Solar Electric Power Association) has recognized Austin Energy as Public Power Utility of the year in 2012 and IREC (Interstate Renewable Energy Council) has given one of its annual Innovation Awards to Austin Energy in September of 2012. It would be great if the Value of Solar will also be applied in other states and regions. With publicly available data, Value of Solar may have expanded use such as in commercial solar rates and in other states and regions. Ultimately, this would translate into a collaborative relationship between the utility and consumers, leading to a more stable grid for all consumers while increasing the longevity of the utility. We look forward to further spreading of use of Value of Solar for it is that final link to the fair and effective way for our world to transition into a sustainable future quickly. Please also get into the habit of checking at these sites below for more on solar energy topics: www.sunisthefuture.net

www.instagram.com/sunisthefuture

www.pinterest.com/sunisthefuture

www.facebook.com/sunisthefuture

www.youtube.com/user/sunisthefuture

www.kiva.org/team/sunisthefuture

www.sunisthefuture.com

www.cafepress.com/mathlady

gathered, written, and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker

Any of your comments will be welcomed below or via sunisthefuture@gmail.com (please note if you do not want your email to be shared)

Homepage: http://www.sunisthefuture.net HTML adl Google+

Share
7 December

Ohio Joins Top States Improving Interconnection Procedures for Renewables

Share

Dear Friends, Visitors/Viewers/Readers,

(Please click on red links below)

————————————————————————————————————————————————————————

Please show your support for Renewable Energy by visiting-signing-sharing Renewable-FIT For Sunshine State!

————————————————————————————————————————————————————————

Since I grew up in the state of Ohio, it is with great fondness that I am sharing this email from Ruth Fein of IREC (Interstate Renewable Energy Council) yesterday, to be shared, below:

December 6, 2013
Ruth Fein : ruthw@irecusa.org

Sun Above Cloud (credit: sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker)

Ohio Joins Top States Improving Interconnection Procedures for Renewables

Ohio joins the ranks of progressive states like California, Hawaii and Massachusetts this week as the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio adopted greatly improved interconnection procedures that make it easier for small renewable energy systems to connect to the distribution grid.

The decision comes on the heels of a similar move by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), which adopted many of the same provisions in a recent revision of the federal Small Generator Interconnection Procedures (SGIP)., available at FERC.

“Ohio’s decision represents a very positive step forward for the deployment of clean energy in the state,” said Jane Weissman, president and CEO of the Interstate Renewable Energy Council, Inc. (IREC). “It makes it possible for more individuals and businesses to benefit from renewable energy and sets a great example for other states that may be considering improvements to their interconnection processes.”

With a steady increase in the number of small renewable energy systems connecting to the distribution grid, it becomes increasingly important to ensure that they can do so in a safe, efficient and cost-effective manner.

“These updates will really help streamline the interconnection process,” said Sky Stanfield an attorney who represents IREC. “Specifically, they will help developers find high-value locations for siting projects and expand the opportunities for projects to follow an expedited review, all while maintaining the safety, power quality and reliability of the grid.”

IREC participated in the Ohio and FERC rulemaking processes for several months beginning in late 2012.

The Ohio commission’s order adopted many of IREC’s key recommendations and makes the following significant improvements upon the existing rules:

Increases the capacity threshold for simplified Level 1 interconnection review from 10 kilowatt (kW) to 25 kW for inverter-based systems and reduces the initial review time from 1 month to 15 business days;

Adopts flexible size eligibility requirements for Level 2 “Fast Track” interconnection review that expands beyond the current two-megawatt limit, depending on proximity of a generator to a substation and line voltage levels;
Implements a uniform, well-defined supplemental review process for applications that may fail one or more initial review Fast Track screens, but that do not impose challenges significant enough to warrant a more extensive study process;

Adopts the emerging best practice of using 100% of minimum load as a penetration screen in the supplemental review process; and

Requires utilities to provide interested customers with a pre-application report, for a $300 flat fee, to help identify areas on the grid that will accommodate distributed generation.

This proactive approach makes Ohio the first state to update its rules since FERC’s approval of the SGIP modifications. While Ohio had a head start on the revision process, the adoption of these new state rules so soon after the FERC’s order encourages a broader move among states to incorporate similar updates for small generator system interconnections into their own state procedures.

About IREC
IREC is a non-profit organization that believes clean energy is critical to achieving a sustainable and economically strong future. To pave this clean energy path, IREC works to expand consumer access to clean energy; generates information and objective analysis grounded in best practices and standards; and leads programs to build a quality clean energy workforce, including a unique credentialing program for training programs and instructors. Since 1982, IREC’s programs and policies have benefitted energy consumers, policymakers, utilities and the clean energy industry. As of July 2013, IREC is an accredited American National Standards Developer. For more information, visit http://www.irecusa.org
————————————————————————————————————————————————————

Please also get into the habit of checking at these sites below for more on solar energy topics:

www.sunisthefuture.net

www.instagram.com/sunisthefuture

www.pinterest.com/sunisthefuture

www.facebook.com/sunisthefuture

www.youtube.com/user/sunisthefuture

www.kiva.org/team/sunisthefuture

www.sunisthefuture.com

www.cafepress.com/mathlady

~have a bright and sunny day~

gathered and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker

Any of your comments will be welcomed below or via sunisthefuture@gmail.com (please note if you do not want your email to be shared)

Homepage: http://www.sunisthefuture.net

HTML adl

Share
25 November

Good News From FERC (Federal Energy Regulatory Commission)

Share

Dear Friends, Visitors/Viewers/Readers,

(Please click on red links below)

————————————————————————————————————————————————————————

Please show your support for Renewable Energy by visiting-signing-sharing Renewable-FIT For Sunshine State!

————————————————————————————————————————————————————————

Great news to share with you: a response to the recent release from FERC (Federal Energy Regulatory Commission) below:

NEWS FOR RELEASE

Sun Through Cloud (credit: sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker)

Contact: Sky Stanfield

sstanfield@kfwlaw.com

This release is in response to the announcement and summary provided by FERC on Nov. 21st, the final rule language and decision have not yet been released.

FERC Announces Rule Changes to Facilitate More Efficient Interconnections for Small Renewable Energy Systems

November 22, 2013 – In a far-reaching decision, yesterday the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) adopted significant modifications to the agency’s Small Generator Interconnection Procedures (SGIP), which should facilitate a more efficient interconnection process for small renewable generators.

“FERC’s rule changes are an important step forward for interconnection in the United States,” said Jane Weissman, president and CEO of the Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC).  “The changes will enable utilities to more effectively process applications for small generators, while maintaining the safety and reliability of the interconnection process – critically important as the country begins to experience a greater penetration of renewables on transmission and distribution circuits.”

The final language of the rule has not yet been released, but based upon the summary provided by FERC, two particularly significant modifications to the review process were authorized that will enable a greater number of small renewable generators to safely interconnect quickly without the need for a lengthy study process.

First, the current SGIP Fast Track size limit was modified by adopting an approach pioneered by IREC’s work. Instead of utilizing a single threshold across the entire system, IREC proposed adopting a size limit that would vary depending upon the generator type, the voltage of the line at the point of interconnection, the thickness of the wire, and the generator’s distance from the substation.

IREC developed this approach after hearing from utilities across the country regarding the relevant factors that determine what size generator can safely interconnect at different points on the system without the need for detailed study.  Instead of limiting Fast Track access to generators sized below 2 MWs, the newly adopted rule will allow certain appropriately located, inverter-based generators up to 5 MWs to interconnect using this expedited process.

Second, in response to the growing volume of interconnection applications and the number of circuits that are starting to see high penetrations of renewables, FERC modified the supplemental review process to incorporate a 100 percent of minimum load screen along with two additional technical screens that evaluate a generators’ impact on safety, reliability and power quality.

Under this modified rule, if a generator fails any of the initial Fast Track review screens, including the contested 15 percent of peak load screen, it can choose to be reviewed under the supplemental review screens rather than proceeding to full study.

“IREC helped to develop these proposed changes through active engagement with a wide range of stakeholders across the country,” said Sky Stanfield of Keyes, Fox & Wiedman, LLP, who represents IREC in regulatory matters. “We believe these changes at the federal level reflect best practices on interconnection and will act as a model for state procedures across the country.”  Michael Sheehan, an electrical engineer working on behalf of IREC, agrees.  “These updated rules will ensure that small renewable projects meet the safety and reliability needs of both the energy end-user and the utility.”

IREC worked in both California and Hawaii on the development of this improved process and believes it will help maintain the efficiency of the interconnection process across the country.

In its ruling, FERC also adopted an innovative Pre-Application Report that will enable generators to access greater information about existing system conditions prior to submitting a formal application. This process is expected to reduce the overall volume of interconnection requests and help make more efficient use of the existing distribution system. IREC assisted with the development of this process in California and Massachusetts and strongly supports its adoption at FERC.

Finally, FERC’s rule modifications allow generators the opportunity to comment on any upgrades that are determined by the utility to be necessary for interconnection of their system.

About IREC

IREC is a non-profit organization that believes clean energy is critical to achieving a sustainable and economically strong future. To pave this clean energy path, IREC works to expand consumer access to clean energy; generates information and objective analysis grounded in best practices and standards; and leads programs to build a quality clean energy workforce, including a unique credentialing program for training programs and instructors. Since 1982, IREC’s programs and policies have benefitted energy consumers, policymakers, utilities and the clean energy industry. As of July 2013, IREC is an accredited American National Standards Developer. For more information, visit http://www.irecusa.org

~have a bright and sunny day~

gathered and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker

Any of your comments will be welcomed below or via sunisthefuture@gmail.com (please note if you do not want your email to be shared)

Homepage: http://www.sunisthefuture.net

RELATED ARTICLES

A Chat With KIUC On The Solar Paradise of Kauai/Residents of Kauai Are Blessed With Sunshine &KIUC

High Penetration Projects In The  U.S.

FERC’s Announcement on “Small Generator Interconnection Agreements and Procedures”

HTML adl

Share
3 August

How Does Community Solar Work?

Share

Dear Friends, Visitors/Viewers/Readers,

(Please click on red links below)

Since our Aug. 1, 2013 post, there’s been quite a few people asking questions about some basic mechanics in how Community Solar Garden works. I’d like to direct you to the page on Start A Community Solar Garden/Farm under the Information section at www.sunisthefuture.net. I would also like to share another video clip that will help with this explanation, below.


Our research and interviews suggest that CEC (Clean Energy Collective)‘s community solar model leverages economies of scale, along with fully maintained array for maximum power production, to deliver  very low price for renewable energy. This would allow consumers/purchasers to bypass the research, construction, maintenance, and ongoing repair of building a costly system of their own. It would also allow renters and owners of poorly sighted properties for solar to participate.

 

This is why community solar (gardens/farms) is important in spreading the solar energy use (Sources: NREL, DOE, IREC, HUD)

Furthermore, as long as they stay within the region serviced by the same utility company, there is the flexibility of having their bill credits move with them. If purchasers need to move out of the region, they may sell their panels any time.

 

I  found  that CEC also had been partnering with SunFarm to establish Vermont’s first community-owned solar garden at Putney, VT, the Putney Community Solar Array (or SunFarm Community Solar), a 147 kW & 588-panel photovoltaic system servicing Green Mountain Power (GMP) utility customers. Solar panel owners in the Putney Community Solar Array will receive all available rebates and tax incentives, as if the system were located on their roof, and will be credited for the power their panels produced on their monthly GMP electric bills. Each panel in the Putney Community Solar Array costs $813 and is expected to pay for itself in about 10-12 years; but owners of the panels will be able to continue receiving power from these solar panels for as long as 50 years or more. To date, over half of the array have been reserved and each of the panel owners will see a power credit on their utility bill as soon as the array goes online this month (August of 2013).

More information on the Putney Community Solar Array:  www.VTSolarGardens.com , email: info@VTSolarGardens.com, or (802) 536-4471.

For more information on Clean Energy Collective: www.easycleanenergy.com or (800)-646-0323.

The future looks bright for solar energy as more and more of these community solar gardens will be springing up throughout our planet earth.  What are you/we waiting for? Let’s start planting our community solar gardens!

~have a bright and sunny day~

gathered, written, and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker

any of your comments and suggestions will be welcomed at sunisthefuture@gmail.com

Homepage: http://www.sunisthefuture.net

HTML adl

Share
19 June

Community Solar resources!

Share

Dear Friends, Visitors/Viewers/Readers,

(Please click on red links below)
__________________________________________________________________________________________

Updates on our Solar-FIT For Sunshine State petition: 165 signatures strong. We need more! Please help us to spread more sunshine by signing this petition and sharing it with others. It is our shared responsibility to move toward the renewable energy age and Sunshine is the cleanest, healthiest, and least war-prone way to go!
__________________________________________________________________________________________

For the spirit of community, I’d like to share some information and resources making it possible for communities to come together to plant solar garden/farm/ program. Below you will find information on federal, state legislation, and tax-related resources.

  1. Community Solar: Power and Ownership for You and Me (IREC, Interstate Renewable Energy Council)
  2. IREC Releases Community Solar Energy Guidelines (GetSolar.com)
  3. Community Solar Farm (Wikipedia)
  4. Vote Solar (votesolar.org)
  5. DSIRE
  6. Shared Renewables HQ
  7. IREC Model Program Rules for Shared Renewables
  8. DC SUN (DC Solar United Neighborhoods) has been working hard to make solar affordable and accessible to every resident of DC. A summary and full text of the bill is available online here.

Let’s take a look at a community solar program in Arizona in the video, below :


Be sure to also check out previous 2 posts (June 18, & 17, 2013) of www.sunisthefuture.net, also on community solar garden/farm/institute.

~have a bright and sunny day~

gathered, written, and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker

any questions or suggestions will be welcomed publicly below in the comment box or privately via sunisthefuture@gmail.com (be sure to note if you do not want the email to be shared).

Homepage:  http://www.sunisthefuture.net

HTML adl

Share
15 March

Massachusetts Paves the Way For More Renewable Energy in the Commonwealth

Share

Dear Friends, Visitors/Viewers/Readers,

Just want to quickly share with you the press release from IREC (Interstate Renewable Energy Council, http://www.irecusa.org) on March 14, 2013, below:

The Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities (DPU) issued an Order yesterday calling for several changes to its model interconnection tariff for distributed generation.  The DPU adopted most of the consensus recommendations suggested by the Distributed Generation Working Group (DGWG) in its September 2012 report and red-lined tariff.  The Interstate Renewable Energy Council, Inc. (IREC) promoted many of the changes adopted by the DPU through its public comments and its participation in the DGWG in an advosory role. IREC commends the efforts of the DPU and the DGWG, which should encourage even more renewable energy growth in Massachusetts.

In recent years, the Common wealth has seen a huge surge of interconnection applications, which shows no signs of slowing down as interest in renewable energy continues to grow.  The revised interconnection procedures adopted yesterday should allow these applications to be processed more efficiently, and more renewable energy projects to come on line. “Massachusetts’ revised interconnection tariff represents a major improvement,” said Erica Schroeder of Keyes, Fox, & Wiedman LLP who represents IREC. “Overall its requirements are more clear and transparent, and more appropriate for the high volume of interconnection applications that Massachusetts is seeing.”

The changes adopted by the DPU touch on various parts of Massachusetts’ interconnection process, from before an application is submitted through the issuance of the interconnection agreement and construction.  For example, the DPU has approved a mandatory pre-application report for projects larger than 500 kilowatts. The pre-application report should help applicants prioritize among potential locations and configurations.  In addition, it should reduce the number of speculative applications that have bogged down the interconnection process in the past.  The updated Massachusetts tariff also includes several improvements to the technical screens for the simplified and expedited processes, which allow certain projects to move more quickly through to interconnection.

A more robust and transparent supplemental review process is another critical improvement in the new tariff.  Supplemental review allows projects that fail the Simplified and  Expedited Screens to still interconnect without full study.  To do so, these projects must pass the three supplemental review screens, which ensure that the project will not affect the safety and reliability of the grid. This improved supplemental review process should save both utilities and renewable developers time and money by avoiding unnecessary study.  It should also allow more projects to interconnect more quickly, while still supporting a healthy grid.

The DPU cited a number of open issues for stakeholders to pursue with respect to interconnection going forward, including the development of a group study process to study multiple, related applications concurrently.  IREC agrees that this is a critical issue to resolve in Massachusetts and plans to participate in the development of an effective group study process.

Another task that the DPU identified to determine the appropriate penetration screen for Supplemental Review.  The DPU adopted the more conservative option in its order yesterday-67 percent of minimum load-but required the new Technical Standards Review Group to spend the next year considering whether or not to increase the screen up to 100 percent of minimum load. “Using 100 percent of minimum load as the penetration screen in supplemental review is an emerging best practice nationally, as we’ve seen, for example, in California and Hawaii,” said Schroeder. “IREC hopes that Massachusetts will join these other states as a renewable energy leader and adopt the 100-percent screen.”

By February 2014, the new Technical Standards Review Group must provide a proposal regarding the supplemental review penetration screen to the DPU.  IREC plans to provide input in the development of this proposal. In the meantime, Massachusetts utilities must file updated individual tariffs in accordance with the revised tariff within 30 days of the order.  They must implement all non-tariffed changes adopted by the order immediately.

About IREC

The Interstate Renewable Energy Council, Inc. (IREC) is a non-profit organization accelerating the use of renewable energy and energy efficiency since 1982.  Its programs and policies lead to easier, more affordable connection to the utility grid;fair credit for renewable energy produced;best practices for states, municipalities, utilities and industries. IREC is a respected resource and national leader in quality assessment, workforce development, consumer protection and stakeholder coordination.  Since 2005, IREC has provided a foundation for the growing clean energy workforce through the credentialing of trainers and training programs and through the development of quality standards. For more information, visit http://www.irecusa.org

gathered and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamker

any of your comments, questions, and suggestions are welcomed at sunisthefuture@gmail.com

Homepage: http://www.sunisthefuture.net


HTML adl

Share
27 November

Cost of Solar Energy Continues Significant Decline, According to National Lab Report

Share

(Please click on red links below)

National Lab Report: Cost of Solar Energy Continues Significant Decline
U.S. Solar “Soft Costs” Offer Opportunity for Additional Price Reduction

The average cost of going solar in the U.S. continued to decrease significantly in 2011 and through the first half of 2012, according to a report released today by the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.  Solar advocates noted that these findings are the latest indicator that solar is an important and growing part of America’s new energy economy.

“This report shows just how far solar power has come in the U.S., and how much more we can do. Faced with a recession economy, messy election politics and an entrenched electricity marketplace, solar is quietly defying the odds and reinventing our national energy landscape. It’s really remarkable,” said Adam Browning, Executive Director of the Vote Solar Initiative.

“With solar energy more affordable than ever, more American families and businesses are going solar to meet their electricity and hot water needs,” said Rhone Resch, president and CEO of the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA). “Declining costs have driven record growth over the last four years and we expect the solar market to double in 2012 and double again in 2013. This growth proves that smart federal and state energy policies diversify our energy portfolio and grow our economy.  With 5,600 companies employing 119,000 Americans, the U.S. solar industry has become an economic engine for America.”

The latest edition of Lawrence Berkeley National Lab’s “Tracking the Sun,” an annual report on solar photovoltaic (PV) costs in the U.S., examined more than 150,000 PV systems installed between 1998 and 2011 and preliminary data from the first half of 2012. Key findings include:

•    The average installed price of residential and commercial PV systems completed in 2011 range from $6.1/W for smaller projects to $4.9/W for larger projects, an 11-14% decrease from the year before. Installed prices fell an additional 3-7% in the first half of 2012.
•    Historically, installed PV prices have declined an average of 5-7% per year from nearly $12/W in 1998, with particularly sharp reductions occurring since 2009.
•    The recent price decline is, in large part, attributable to falling module prices, which fell by $2.1/W from 2008 through 2011, and have fallen further still in 2012.
•    Non-module costs, such as installation labor, marketing, overhead, inverters, and the balance of systems for residential and commercial systems declined by roughly 30% from 1998 to 2011, but have not declined as rapidly as module prices in recent years. Market-building policies that target non-module or “soft” costs represent a significant opportunity for continued price reduction.

Tracking the Sun gives us more good solar news as we see efficiencies built into labor and permitting practices without sacrificing quality and safety,” said Jane Weissman, executive director, Interstate Renewable Energy Council, Inc. (IREC).”The solar industry has built in safeguards through standard-based performance and competency assessment programs which together lead to consumer confidence and sustainable market growth.”

The price declines found in Tracking the Sun add to a number of recent reports that illustrate:

•    Rapid Market Growth: PV installations totaled 742 megawatts (MW) in Q2 2012, up 45% over the previous quarter and 116% over Q2 2011. Source: Solar Market Insight report from GTM Research and SEIA.
•    Strong Job Growth: Solar employs 119,000 Americans across all 50 states. Solar job growth has far outpaced the general economy with 13.2% annual growth over 2011. Source: The National Solar Jobs Census from the Solar Foundation.
•    Overwhelming Bipartisan Support: 92% of Americans agree that it’s important to use and develop more solar. Source: Hart Research National Solar Survey 2012

An infographic illustrating the U.S. solar industry’s recent success is available at: http://votesolar.org/2012/11/infographic/
The full Tracking the Sun report is available at: http://emp.lbl.gov/sites/all/files/LBNL-5919e-REPORT.pdf

###

About Vote Solar:
Founded in 2002, the Vote Solar Initiative is a grassroots non-profit organization working to combat climate change and foster economic development by bringing solar energy into the mainstream. www.votesolar.org

About SEIA:
Established in 1974, the Solar Energy Industries Association® is the national trade association of the U.S. solar energy industry. Through advocacy and education, SEIA® is building a strong solar industry to power America. As the voice of the industry, SEIA works with its 1,100 member companies to make solar a mainstream and significant energy source by expanding markets, removing market barriers strengthening the industry and educating the public on the benefits of solar energy. Visit SEIA online at www.seia.org

About IREC:
The Interstate Renewable Energy Council, Inc. (IREC) is a non-profit organization accelerating the use of renewable energy since 1982. IREC’s programs and policies lead to easier, more affordable connection to the utility grid; fair credit for renewable energy produced; best practices for states, municipalities, utilities and industry; and quality assessment for the growing clean energy workforce through the credentialing of trainers and training programs. www.irecusa.org

Media contacts:
Vote Solar – Rosalind Jackson, Rosalind@votesolar.org, 415-817-5061
SEIA – Jamie Nolan, JNolan@SEIA.org, 202-556-2886
IREC –Jane Pulaski, janep@irecusa.org

~have a bright and sunny day~

posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker, sunisthefuture@gmail.com


Homepage:  http://www.sunisthefuture.net


HTML adl

 


 

 

Share

Copyright © 2011-2018 · Susan Sun Nunamaker All Rights Reserved · Sunisthefuture.net