Posts Tagged ‘Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’

1 January

May JCESR (DOE’s Batteries and Energy Storage Hub) Lead U.S. To The Forefront of Battery Storage Technology

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Dear Friends and Visitors/Readers/Viewers,

Sorry about the delay of this post.  There were simply too much to tend to in December of 2012.

(Please be sure to click on the red links below for more information.)

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Remember the three most difficult triad I’ve mentioned (back in the Dec. 1, 2012 post) historically associated with being the barrier to prevalent implementation of solar energy is: cost, efficiency, and battery storage.  This post will complete our third element of the triad, demonstrating our hopeful future in battery storage technology.

In December of 2012, the Secretary Stephen Chu of U.S. Department of Energy announced the creation of a research center focusing on  battery and energy storage technology.   U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded up to $120 million over five years to a multi-partner team led by Argonne National Laboratory

Aerial view of the Argonne National Laboratory (Credit; Argonne National Laboratory)

to establish a new batteries and energy-storage hub, also known as the Joint Center for Energy Storage Research (JCESR), will combine the research and development of:

  1. five DOE national laboratories (Argonne National LaboratoryLawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)
  2. five universities (Northwestern University, University of Illinois-Chicago, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of Chicago, and University of Michigan)
  3. four private firms (Johnson Controls, Dow Chemical Company, Applied Materials and Clean Energy Trust)

JCESR is a major research partnership that integrates academic, government, and industrial researchers from many disciplines to overcome critical scientific and technical barriers and create new energy  storage technology. This JCESR Consortium

JCESR conference in Chicago in December of 2012

is aiming to make U.S. a battery powerhouse, with an ambitious  5-year goal of developing batteries that will be 5-times more powerful and 5-times less expensive than the current battery technology.  Below, is a video clip of  the press conference at Chicago regarding JCESR:

“This is a partnership between world leading scientists and world leading companies, committed to ensuring that the advanced battery technologies the world needs will be invented and built right here in America,” said Secretary Chu.  “Based on the tremendous advances that have been made in the past few years, there are very good reasons to believe that advanced battery technologies can and will play an increasingly valuable role in strengthening America’s energy and economic security by reducing our oil dependence, upgrading our aging power grid, and allowing us to take greater advantage of intermittent energy sources like wind and solar.”

Hear! Hear !  Secretary Chu!  We look forward to the day when battery storage will no longer be a barrier but a promoter of prevalent implementation of solar energy!  We hope Secretary Chu’s vision will enable the creation of a single-home, blackout immune solar power solution, which is only possible if storage technology improves, allowing a small solar grid to hang on to generated electricity in cases of disconnection from the traditional electrical grid.

Much is happening in the Solar World this year! Keep checking back for more exciting updates, fellow solar enthusiasts!

~have a bright and sunny day~

Gathered, written, and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker.  Your input/questions/suggestions/comments are always welcomed at sunisthefuture@gmail.com

Homepage: http://www.sunisthefuture.net


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27 November

Cost of Solar Energy Continues Significant Decline, According to National Lab Report

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National Lab Report: Cost of Solar Energy Continues Significant Decline
U.S. Solar “Soft Costs” Offer Opportunity for Additional Price Reduction

The average cost of going solar in the U.S. continued to decrease significantly in 2011 and through the first half of 2012, according to a report released today by the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.  Solar advocates noted that these findings are the latest indicator that solar is an important and growing part of America’s new energy economy.

“This report shows just how far solar power has come in the U.S., and how much more we can do. Faced with a recession economy, messy election politics and an entrenched electricity marketplace, solar is quietly defying the odds and reinventing our national energy landscape. It’s really remarkable,” said Adam Browning, Executive Director of the Vote Solar Initiative.

“With solar energy more affordable than ever, more American families and businesses are going solar to meet their electricity and hot water needs,” said Rhone Resch, president and CEO of the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA). “Declining costs have driven record growth over the last four years and we expect the solar market to double in 2012 and double again in 2013. This growth proves that smart federal and state energy policies diversify our energy portfolio and grow our economy.  With 5,600 companies employing 119,000 Americans, the U.S. solar industry has become an economic engine for America.”

The latest edition of Lawrence Berkeley National Lab’s “Tracking the Sun,” an annual report on solar photovoltaic (PV) costs in the U.S., examined more than 150,000 PV systems installed between 1998 and 2011 and preliminary data from the first half of 2012. Key findings include:

•    The average installed price of residential and commercial PV systems completed in 2011 range from $6.1/W for smaller projects to $4.9/W for larger projects, an 11-14% decrease from the year before. Installed prices fell an additional 3-7% in the first half of 2012.
•    Historically, installed PV prices have declined an average of 5-7% per year from nearly $12/W in 1998, with particularly sharp reductions occurring since 2009.
•    The recent price decline is, in large part, attributable to falling module prices, which fell by $2.1/W from 2008 through 2011, and have fallen further still in 2012.
•    Non-module costs, such as installation labor, marketing, overhead, inverters, and the balance of systems for residential and commercial systems declined by roughly 30% from 1998 to 2011, but have not declined as rapidly as module prices in recent years. Market-building policies that target non-module or “soft” costs represent a significant opportunity for continued price reduction.

Tracking the Sun gives us more good solar news as we see efficiencies built into labor and permitting practices without sacrificing quality and safety,” said Jane Weissman, executive director, Interstate Renewable Energy Council, Inc. (IREC).”The solar industry has built in safeguards through standard-based performance and competency assessment programs which together lead to consumer confidence and sustainable market growth.”

The price declines found in Tracking the Sun add to a number of recent reports that illustrate:

•    Rapid Market Growth: PV installations totaled 742 megawatts (MW) in Q2 2012, up 45% over the previous quarter and 116% over Q2 2011. Source: Solar Market Insight report from GTM Research and SEIA.
•    Strong Job Growth: Solar employs 119,000 Americans across all 50 states. Solar job growth has far outpaced the general economy with 13.2% annual growth over 2011. Source: The National Solar Jobs Census from the Solar Foundation.
•    Overwhelming Bipartisan Support: 92% of Americans agree that it’s important to use and develop more solar. Source: Hart Research National Solar Survey 2012

An infographic illustrating the U.S. solar industry’s recent success is available at: http://votesolar.org/2012/11/infographic/
The full Tracking the Sun report is available at: http://emp.lbl.gov/sites/all/files/LBNL-5919e-REPORT.pdf

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About Vote Solar:
Founded in 2002, the Vote Solar Initiative is a grassroots non-profit organization working to combat climate change and foster economic development by bringing solar energy into the mainstream. www.votesolar.org

About SEIA:
Established in 1974, the Solar Energy Industries Association® is the national trade association of the U.S. solar energy industry. Through advocacy and education, SEIA® is building a strong solar industry to power America. As the voice of the industry, SEIA works with its 1,100 member companies to make solar a mainstream and significant energy source by expanding markets, removing market barriers strengthening the industry and educating the public on the benefits of solar energy. Visit SEIA online at www.seia.org

About IREC:
The Interstate Renewable Energy Council, Inc. (IREC) is a non-profit organization accelerating the use of renewable energy since 1982. IREC’s programs and policies lead to easier, more affordable connection to the utility grid; fair credit for renewable energy produced; best practices for states, municipalities, utilities and industry; and quality assessment for the growing clean energy workforce through the credentialing of trainers and training programs. www.irecusa.org

Media contacts:
Vote Solar – Rosalind Jackson, Rosalind@votesolar.org, 415-817-5061
SEIA – Jamie Nolan, JNolan@SEIA.org, 202-556-2886
IREC –Jane Pulaski, janep@irecusa.org

~have a bright and sunny day~

posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker, sunisthefuture@gmail.com


Homepage:  http://www.sunisthefuture.net


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