Posts Tagged ‘MA’

27 May

Solar Powered Flying Pods of Transit X Are Coming!

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Dear Friends, Visitors/Viewers/Readers,

Below, is a repost from our sister publication, Windermere Sun.

(Please click on red links & note magenta)

Transit X passenger view (credit: Transit X)

Transit X in Boston (credit: Transit X)

Transit X pod with family (credit: Transit X)

Transit X viewed from sidewalk (credit: Transit X)

Florida Transit X (credit: Transit X)

 

Windermere Blue Sunset (credit: Windermere Sun-Susan Sun Nunamaker)
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After a week of reporting on Trump affairs, I really have to thank Dave Finnigan (of jugglingedge.com) for bringing to my attention a much more refreshing topic, a solar powered, quiet, clean, and efficient mass transit system, developed by Transit X.

Transit X in Boston (credit: Transit X)

Transit X passenger view (credit: Transit X)

TransitX-3m-slides for MIT Solve from Mike Stanley on Vimeo.
c
TransitX Indiegogo video v2 from Mike Stanley on Vimeo.
Can you envision our future world, where commuters would have access to wait-free, pollution-free, and accidents-free commute, 24/7 available, autopiloted within cities, beside highways, and along rail corridors? It is a privately-funded surface transportation network with the convenience, capacity, and cost that would offer much relief for our current buses, trains, cars, trucks, and short flights. With our current earthly population of over 7 billion, growing toward 9 billion, we will be needing much help with our current transporting system. Transit X pods may be the perfect solution for our 21st century transportation network, beyond what the Jestsons sic-fi cartoon offers, by having its autopilot feature and seating from one to five. It would also be a great way to help reduce the rate of climate change.

 

Transit X pod with family (credit: Transit X)

Transit X’s solar powered pod system has many advantages:

Headshot of Mike Stanley, founder and CEO of Transit X (credit: Transit X)

  1. It is 100% solar powered, with solar cells on the track providing the energy to charge pods, and therefore providing carbon-free and zero pollution.
  2. It is fast, with nonstop travel at 45 mph (72km/h) along main pods and 135 mph (217 km/h) along highways.
  3. It is much safer than our current roadway system, about 100,000 times safer, according to Transit X founders.
  4. It is affordable and with comparable fares to conventional mass transit. Private financing is possible even with low population density (350 people/km squared)
  5. Cities and towns can apply now to begin service in 2019. Installation is fast and not disruptive to neighborhoods. The first pilot will be ready in Boston, MA by end of 2018.

Below, is a video of an interview of Founder and CEO of Transit X Mike Stanley, by Jay Sugarman:

Interview with Founder and CEO of Transit X from Mike Stanley on Vimeo.

Transit X for Oct 27 Transit Technology Day from Mike Stanley above.

 

NBC Boston Bridgewater from Mike Stanley above.

About three weeks ago, Mike Stanley was here in Central Florida to give a demonstration/talk about Transit X, for Osceola County Commissioner Transportation meeting, Orlando City Commissioner (of District 4) Patty Sheehan, and Orlando City Director of Sustainability Chris Castro.  Subsequently, Dave Finnigan gave a two minute presentation to Metropolitan Orlando about Transit X, and also briefed Carolyn Fennell (of Airport Authority), Nicole Liquori (CEO of Sunrail), Eric Johnson (CEO of Lynx), and Laura Kelley (Director of Central Florida Expressway Authority) about Transit X.

Allow me to share a blueprint of the Florida Transit X Way, below:

Florida Transit X (credit: Transit X)

While we anxiously await for the first Transit X pods to be running in MA by the end of  2018, innovators, solar enthusiasts,  and potential investors of Central Florida and other parts of the world are strongly encouraged to  get in touch with Mike or Dave Stanley, via:

This is the way of the future! For those of you/us participating in its realization may help to save our planet earth!

 

Gathered, written, and posted by Windermere Sun-Susan Sun Nunamaker

~have a bright and sunny day~

Any comments, suggestions, concerns regarding this post will be welcomed at sunisthefuture@gmail.com

Gathered, written, and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker
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16 April

1366 Technologies May Truly Be A Solar Constant ?!

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Dear Friends, Visitors/Viewers/Readers,

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Watching the list of solar energy companies to appear and disappear over the years is almost like watching a revolving door….as solar energy industry continues to evolve. Yes, cost and efficiency are the two areas where many solar companies are concentrating their energy and effort in at the moment.  In recent years, many companies are directing their effort toward kerfless technology. One of these companies, 1366 Technologies, is worth keeping an eye on. The company’s name is referenced to the solar constantrepresenting the watts of solar energy that hits each square meter of the surface of the earth. It is  a company based in Bedford, Massachusetts that has developed a technique to produce silicon wafers by casting them in their ultimate shape directly in a mold, rather than the prevailing standard method in which wafers are cut from a large ingot.  The company aims to manufacture multi-crystalline silicon wafers, the building blocks of solar cells, at half the cost of current methods.

Traditional solar technologies may be replaced by thin and kerfless wafter technologes (credit: Smallman12q/Wikipedia)

Traditional solar technologies may be replaced by thin and kerfless wafter technologes (credit: Smallman12q/Wikipedia)

1366 Technologies casts wafers with a conventional thickness from molten silicon, creating a more uniform wafer quality than the current industry standard. (credit: Bob Frechette of 1366 Technologies)

1366 Technologies casts wafers with a conventional thickness from molten silicon, creating a more uniform wafer quality than the current industry standard. (credit: Bob Frechette of 1366 Technologies)

The company used a $4 million grant obtained from the United States Department of Energy‘s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) program in December 2009 to fund research over an 18-month period. Grants from ARPA-E are designed to provide money to relatively small projects offering the potential for high-payoff results in fostering advanced techniques. 1366 Technologies was able to announce eight months into the grant period that it had achieved success in its casting technology, in which molten silicon is poured directly into a mold to produce wafers in their final form, a square 6 inches (15 cm) on each side that is 200 micrometers thick and are then extracted from the mold using a proprietary technique to ensure that the wafer doesn’t break while being removed from the mold. In traditional methods, wafers of this size are cut from a large single ingot or crystal, in an approach that leaves as much as half of the original silicon ingot as waste.


Below, a video that was published back in 2009 on the basics behind silicon-based solar cell technology by 1366 Technologies:


David Danielson, program director for solar energy at ARPA-E said that “early indications show this could be one of our great success stories.” ARPA-E’s first director Arun Majumdar estimated that current techniques generate solar power at a cost of $4 per watt, and that bringing down that cost to $1.50 per watt could lead to the widespread adoption of solar energy (solar industry is evolving very fast and is currently already at the cost level of slightly over $1.00 per watt). Company president Frank van Mierlo estimated that solar power generated using wafers from 1366 Technologies would be cheaper than power generated using coal. The company is now on their third generation of wafer-producing machines, which are full-sized, industrial line machines. The company will open a commercial-scale factory in upstate New York, slated for completion in 2017. This plant will start producing 50 million wafers annually, totaling 250 megawatts of output. It will eventually scale to 600 million wafers and 3,000 MW of annual production.

1366 Technologies has raised $70 million in capital to commercialize their innovation, from such investors as South Korean Hanwha Chemical, a major user of silicon wafers, as well as from Ventizz Capital Fund, North Bridge Venture Partners and Polaris Venture Partners.


As the revolving door continues to rotate during Solar Evolution/Revolution, perhaps the name of a solar constant will bring forth a  longer stay than other abbreviated variables.

 

~have a bright and sunny day~
Any comments, suggestions, concerns regarding this post will be welcomed at sunisthefuture@gmail.com

Gathered, written, and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker
Please also get into the habit of checking at these sites below for more on solar energy topics:

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8 May

Bravo For These Leading Solar Cities!!!

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Dear Friends, Visitors/Viewers/Readers, (Please click on red links below),

A quick note to share these 20 cities in USA that are leading in Solar, below:

Cities Leading in Solar (These cities are pushing solar into the mainstream energy sector. Credit: Environmental California)

HURRAY for ALL of them in helping to push Solar into the mainstream energy sector!!!

~have a bright and sunny day~

Gathered, written, and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker

Any of your comments/suggestions/questions will be welcomed at sunisthefuture@gmail.com

Related Post: Hurray For Solar Landfill; The Amazing EGSC (Exposed Geomembrane Solar Cover) ;Landfills+Community Solar=Great Opportunities & Savings.

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30 April

Hurray For Solar Landfills!

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Dear Friends, Visitors/Viewers/Readers, (Please click on red links below),

Solar & Wind Projects at Massachusetts Landfills (credit: MassDEP)

Just came across a wonderful article at The Enterprise, by Jennifer Bray, about the town of Easton, MA, harnessing solar power from the landfill  at 114 Prospect St., to pay bills. The ribbon-cutting to celebrate the 1.9 megawatt solar installation was scheduled on April 30, 2014. The town of Easton is estimating a reduction of $200,000 for the town’s electric bill as a result of this solar installation. The Borrego Solar Systems covered the cost of the project and installation of the solar panels and leased eight acres of land from the town of Easton. The town of Easton then buys the power generated at a discount. Adding the revenue, energy credits, and annual $33,000 lease, the town is expecting a total of approximately $225,000 of savings per year. Easton and Borrego Solar Systems have a 20-year contract that will save Easton nearly $4.5 million in that time frame. This solar installation will  produce amount of electricity to support 235 homes per year. This is a fantastic example of how the otherwise non-buildable surface area may be put into good use, saving the town almost quarter of a million dollars annually while helping to reduce carbon footprint. I wonder how many other landfills, at MA and other states and other countries are taking advantage of their landfills. The result of my wondering led to the map shared above, Solar and Wind Projects at Massachusetts Landfills. More detailed information about each city or town of MA where the project is located, applicants, each landfill’s physical address, description of the renewable energy installation and current status of the project, and the date of MassDEP’s decision and relevant approval document(s) are available at this table. May all states in USA and other countries on planet earth soon realize the full potential of their landfills!

~have a bright and sunny day~

Gathered, written, and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker

Any of your comments/suggestions/questions will be welcomed at sunisthefuture@gmail.com

Related Post: The Amazing EGSC (Exposed Geomembrane Solar Cover)

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28 January

An Abbey’s Path To Fiscal Salvation Through Solar Energy & Solar Chocolates

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Few weeks ago I came across an interesting piece of news regarding some solar activity up in MA. Upon further investigation, it was quite wonderful to find out how solar power is able to help preserve the simple life for the sisters at Mount Saint Mary’s Abbey and their fine Trappistine Quality Candy. This group of 44

Sisters of Mount St. Mary's Abbey in Wrentham, MA (credit: Mount St. Mary's Abbey)

cloistered nuns have set records in leveraging green energy on their property while helping to reduce the town’s energy cost. At 300 Arnold St. in Wrentham, the monastery installed a 130-foot-tall wind turbine in the field beside its sheep pasture in 2009. They didn’t stop there, but continued on with installing more than 20,000 solar panels in a field on the Trappistine order’s property, harvesting electricity.

Trappistine Sisters at Mount Saint Mary's Abbey under the solar panels on their Wrentham fields, concerned about conservation of the environment and managed natural resources prudently. Sr Alice Chau , Sr. Christa-Maria, and Sr. Bonitas. These sisters taut the three "L's": Liturgy, Lectio Divina, and Labor. (credit: Mount St. Mary's Abbey)

Back in Nov. of 2012, Franklin Town Council entered a power purchase agreement with a Newton green energy firm planning to build a solar farm atop 11-acre parcel in Franklin owned by nuns of Mount St. Mary’s Abbey (a monastery of nuns in Wrentham overseen by the Order of Cistercians of the Strict Observance). Kearsarge Energy is leasing the land from the monastery until 2033, paying the order about $116,000 for the first year and an unspecified set amount every year afterward. In the meantime, the town collects net metering credits from the 12,000-panel farm to offset 10% of its energy cost for the next 20 years, saving about $40,000. “This allows us to purchase power below our current costs for the next 20 years as well as get real and personal property taxes for as long as the solar farm exists on the nuns’ property,” said Town Administrator Jeffrey Nutting. After this first phase of a large renewable energy project, Kearsarge  constructs a bigger farm on the monastery’s property, costing about $5 million. So eventually the farm  expands to span 22 acres and include around 22,000 solar panels producing 6 MW (megawatt) of energy.

Father Kevin Hunt blesses the new solar farm at Mount St. Mary's Abbey in Wrentham on Dec. 7, 2013 (Credit: www.PilotCatholicNews.com -Christopher S. Pineo)

Net metering allows the town to generate its own electricity and reduce the amount it has to purchase from National Grid, the majority energy provider in Wrentham. A meter records how much power the solar panels generate. When more electricity is generated than used, the town receives credits to be sold back to National Grid.

Nutting negotiated with Kearsarge for about a year and said the venture benefits every one involved, “The nuns get money, we get revenue, we save money on our energy bill…so it’s a win-win-win all around.”

The monastery fields in Wrentham worked as a dairy farm in the past. Today the sisters support themselves through the makings of fine chocolates and other confections at their  Trappistine Quality Candy factory on the monastery grounds.

 

 

Trappistine Quality Candy/Solar Chocolates (credit: Mount St. Mary's Abbey)

Trappistine Quality Candy/Solar Chocolates (credit: Mount. St. Mary's Abbey)

 

 

Consider Trappistine Quality Candy (where confections are made with Love & Prayers by The Nuns of Mount St. Mary's Abbey) during Valentine season. (credit: Mount St. Mary's Abbey)

Using geothermal energy to heat and cool their building and hosting both solar and wind energy on their property have been multi-faceted blessings. This provides the sisters the joy of living in obedience with their life of faith, helps them to offset their operating costs, and benefits their neighbors, the Town of Franklin. A community such as Mount St. Mary’s Abbey would be welcomed in any community! We should all look toward these sisters as example in their stewardship toward alternative/renewable energy projects! As Mother Maureen reminded us the connection of their order with green energy, in the excerpt from the Cistercian Constitutions:

Following the example of the Fathers of Citeaux, who sought an uncomplicated relationship with God of simplicity, the sisters’ lifestyle is to be plain and frugal…The sisters are to be concerned about conservation of the environment and to manage natural resources prudently….”

Simiar topic

~have a bright and sunny day~

Gathered, written, and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker

Any of your comments/suggestions/questions will be welcomed at sunisthefuture@gmail.com

Please also get into the habit of checking at these sites below for more on solar energy topics:

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2 October

Solar Decathlon 2011-Statistics From the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2011

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If you are in favor of renewable,  clean, or solar energy, please sign this petition for FIT/CLEAN Program, accessible at http://sunisthefuture.net/?page_id=1065 Thank you very much.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MibIzEE-xOE

Statistics from the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2011:

·         Even though a majority of the competition days were cloudy, seven out of the 19 houses produced more energy than they consumed

·         357,000 house visits were provided to the public during 10 days

·         92,000 votes were cast for the People’s Choice Award, more than five times the number of votes cast during the previous competition

·         A new Affordability Contest was featured, demonstrating the reasonable cost of many energy-saving home improvement products and design solutions available today

·         Approximately 4,000 collegiate students earned valuable experience by building an energy efficient house with peers in other disciplines, helping them prepare to enter the clean energy workforce

·         Collegiate teams from five countries and four continents participated

 

Solar Decathlon 2011 teams that competed on the National Mall’s West Potomac Park:

 

Solar Decathlon 2011 Final Scores and Standings

1. Maryland 951.151
2. Purdue 931.390
3. New Zealand 919.058
4. Middlebury College 914.809
5. Ohio State 903.938
6. SCI-Arc/Caltech 899.490
7. Illinois 875.715
8. Tennessee 859.132
9. Team Massachusetts 856.351
10. Canada 836.423
11. Florida Int’l 833.159
12. Appalachian State 832.499
13. Parsons NS Stevens 828.816
14. Tidewater Virginia 774.910
15. Team China 765.471
16. Team Belgium 709.843
17. Team New York 677.356
18. Team New Jersey 669.352
19. Team Florida 619.006

Solar Decathlon 2011 Individual Contest Winners

Affordability (Awarded Tuesday, September 27, 2011) Contest

Empowerhouse of Parsons New School of Design and  Stevens Institute of Technology tied first place with E-Cube of Belgium’s Ghent University.

Empowerhouse of Parson New School of Design and Stevens Institute of Technology shines brightly at night after a stormy day

Stephen Scribner (front) accepts first place in the Affordability Contest on behalf of Parsons The New School for Design and Stevens Institute of Technology

and Team Belgium Ghent University’s E-Cube

visitors waiting in line to tour inside the finished E-Cube of Team Belgium Ghent University. This is the only entry of Solar Decathlon with second floor, essentially a building kit for a relatively inexperienced builder.

 

Belgium Toon Vermeir checks the tight competition stands online in the child’s bedroom on the second floor of E-Cube (but due to lack of handicap/wheelchair accessibility, the second floor was closed off to visitors)

tied for first and earned the full 100 points in the contest by constructing houses estimated to cost $229,890 and $249,568, respectively. New for the Solar Decathlon 2011, the Affordability contest encouraged teams to design and build affordable houses that combine energy efficient construction and appliances with renewable energy systems. A professional estimator determined the construction cost of each house. Teams earned 100 points for achieving a target construction cost of $250,000 or less. A sliding point scale was applied to houses with estimated construction costs between $250,001 and $600,000.

 

Appliances (Awarded Saturday, October 1, 2011) Contest

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Students from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign speaks with the Engineering Jury during judging

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign’s Re_home shine brightly at night, with Washington Monument in the background

took first place and earned 99.955 out of 100 possible points by outperforming the other 18 houses in keeping its refrigerator and freezer cold, washing and drying loads of laundry during the contest week, and running a dishwasher during the competition. The Appliances Contest is designed to mimic the appliance use of an average U.S. house.

Architecture (Awarded Wednesday, September 28, 2011) Contest
Maryland took first place in the Architecture Contest

University of Maryland became the first team to have an electricity meter installed

University of Maryland’s team members celebrate after being presented with First Place in Architecture Contest

and earned 96 points out of a possible 100. A jury of architects judged homes on the aesthetic and functional elements of the home’s design; integration and energy efficiency of electrical and natural light; inspiration and delight to Solar Decathlon visitors; and documentation including drawings, a project manual, and an audiovisual architecture presentation that accurately reflect the constructed project on the competition site.

Comfort Zone (Awarded Saturday, October 1, 2011) Contest
Ohio State University topped the contestants in the Comfort Zone Contest,

Ohio State University’s enCORE shines brightly at night

The Ohio State University team shows visitors the air supply system of their house, enCORE

with 98.652 out of 100 points for maintaining indoor temperatures between 71 and 76 degrees Fahrenheit and relative humidity below 60 percent.

Communications (Awarded Friday, September 30, 2011) Contest
Middlebury College’s communications efforts,

Middlebury College’s Self-Reliance shines brightly at night after a stormy day

Middlebury College students pose for photo after accepting the first place award for Communication Contest

including communications plans, student-led tours, and team website, were judged by a jury of website and public relations experts, and won the contest with a score of 90 points out of a possible 100 points.

Engineering (Awarded Thursday, September 29, 2011) Contest
New Zealand won the Engineering contest,

New Zealand’s First Light shines brightly at night

New Zealand’s Victoria University of Wellington celebrate after taking first place in Engineering Contest

which was evaluated by a group of prominent engineers, who determined which solar home best exemplified excellence in functionality, efficiency, innovation, reliability and documentation of its energy systems. New Zealand scored 93 out of a possible 100 points.

Home Entertainment (Awarded Saturday, October 1, 2011) Contest
Middlebury College earned 98.560 out of a possible 100 points in this contest, which required students to use electricity generated by their solar houses to run interior and exterior lights, a TV, a computer, and a kitchen appliance to boil water. Teams were also required to hold two dinner parties and a movie night for neighbors.

Middlebury College’s student Melissa Segil prepares a dish during a competition dinner party

Hot Water (Awarded Saturday, October 1, 2011) Contest
Seven teams tied for first and earned the full 100 points in the Hot Water contest’s “shower tests,” which aimed to deliver 15 gallons of hot water in ten minutes or less. Of course, the water was heated by the sun. Tying for top honors in this contest were:  Appalachian State University,  University of Maryland, New Zealand’s Ghent University, Ohio State UniversityParsons NS Stevens, SCI-Arc/Caltech, and Tennessee.

Chelsea Royall, front, Team Design Director of Appalachian State University, talks about her team’s house (The Solar Homestead) on Media Preview Day

New Zealand’s First Light’s dining room

Maryland’s Watershed clear view

   University of TN’s Living Light shines brightly at night

Future homeowners of Empowerhouse of Parson New School of Design & Stevens Institute of Technology  

rainbow seen between SCI-Arc/Caltech’CHIP (left) & Ohio State University’s  enCORE(right)

Energy Balance (Awarded Saturday, October 1, 2011) Contest
Seven teams tied for first and earned the full 100 points in the Energy Balance contest. Teams earned points for producing at least as much energy as their houses needed during the contest week. The teams accomplished this by balancing production and consumption. Tying for top honors in this contest were:  Florida International,

Illinois, Maryland, New Zealand, Purdue, SCI-Arc/Caltech, and Tennessee.

Market Appeal (Awarded Saturday, October 1, 2011) Contest
Middlebury College won the Market Appeal contest, which evaluated whether the cost-effective construction and solar technology in a team’s design would create a viable product on the open market. Judges gauged market appeal based on three criteria:  livability, marketability and constructability. Middlebury earned 95 points out of a possible 100 as judged by the professional jury.

More about the Solar Decathlon

The U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2011 is an award-winning program that challenges collegiate students from around the world to design, build and operate solar-powered houses that are affordable, highly energy efficient, attractive, and easy to live in. The competition shows consumers how to save money and energy with affordable clean energy products that are available today. The nearly two-year projects culminated in an unprecedented display of affordable green living and design on the National Mall’s West Potomac Park from September 23 – October 2, 2011. The Solar Decathlon also provides participating students with hands-on experience and unique training that prepares them to enter our nation’s clean energy workforce, supporting the Obama Administration’s goal of transitioning to a clean energy economy while saving families and businesses money.

posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker, sunisthefuture@gmail.com

Homepage: http://sunisthefuture.net

Any comments and suggestions are welcomed at sunisthefuture@gmail.com

Please also get into the habit of checking at these sites below for more on solar energy topics:

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