Posts Tagged ‘University of Tennessee’

2 October

Solar Decathlon 2011-Statistics From the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2011

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If you are in favor of renewable,  clean, or solar energy, please sign this petition for FIT/CLEAN Program, accessible at http://sunisthefuture.net/?page_id=1065 Thank you very much.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MibIzEE-xOE

Statistics from the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2011:

·         Even though a majority of the competition days were cloudy, seven out of the 19 houses produced more energy than they consumed

·         357,000 house visits were provided to the public during 10 days

·         92,000 votes were cast for the People’s Choice Award, more than five times the number of votes cast during the previous competition

·         A new Affordability Contest was featured, demonstrating the reasonable cost of many energy-saving home improvement products and design solutions available today

·         Approximately 4,000 collegiate students earned valuable experience by building an energy efficient house with peers in other disciplines, helping them prepare to enter the clean energy workforce

·         Collegiate teams from five countries and four continents participated

 

Solar Decathlon 2011 teams that competed on the National Mall’s West Potomac Park:

 

Solar Decathlon 2011 Final Scores and Standings

1. Maryland 951.151
2. Purdue 931.390
3. New Zealand 919.058
4. Middlebury College 914.809
5. Ohio State 903.938
6. SCI-Arc/Caltech 899.490
7. Illinois 875.715
8. Tennessee 859.132
9. Team Massachusetts 856.351
10. Canada 836.423
11. Florida Int’l 833.159
12. Appalachian State 832.499
13. Parsons NS Stevens 828.816
14. Tidewater Virginia 774.910
15. Team China 765.471
16. Team Belgium 709.843
17. Team New York 677.356
18. Team New Jersey 669.352
19. Team Florida 619.006

Solar Decathlon 2011 Individual Contest Winners

Affordability (Awarded Tuesday, September 27, 2011) Contest

Empowerhouse of Parsons New School of Design and  Stevens Institute of Technology tied first place with E-Cube of Belgium’s Ghent University.

Empowerhouse of Parson New School of Design and Stevens Institute of Technology shines brightly at night after a stormy day

Stephen Scribner (front) accepts first place in the Affordability Contest on behalf of Parsons The New School for Design and Stevens Institute of Technology

and Team Belgium Ghent University’s E-Cube

visitors waiting in line to tour inside the finished E-Cube of Team Belgium Ghent University. This is the only entry of Solar Decathlon with second floor, essentially a building kit for a relatively inexperienced builder.

 

Belgium Toon Vermeir checks the tight competition stands online in the child’s bedroom on the second floor of E-Cube (but due to lack of handicap/wheelchair accessibility, the second floor was closed off to visitors)

tied for first and earned the full 100 points in the contest by constructing houses estimated to cost $229,890 and $249,568, respectively. New for the Solar Decathlon 2011, the Affordability contest encouraged teams to design and build affordable houses that combine energy efficient construction and appliances with renewable energy systems. A professional estimator determined the construction cost of each house. Teams earned 100 points for achieving a target construction cost of $250,000 or less. A sliding point scale was applied to houses with estimated construction costs between $250,001 and $600,000.

 

Appliances (Awarded Saturday, October 1, 2011) Contest

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Students from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign speaks with the Engineering Jury during judging

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign’s Re_home shine brightly at night, with Washington Monument in the background

took first place and earned 99.955 out of 100 possible points by outperforming the other 18 houses in keeping its refrigerator and freezer cold, washing and drying loads of laundry during the contest week, and running a dishwasher during the competition. The Appliances Contest is designed to mimic the appliance use of an average U.S. house.

Architecture (Awarded Wednesday, September 28, 2011) Contest
Maryland took first place in the Architecture Contest

University of Maryland became the first team to have an electricity meter installed

University of Maryland’s team members celebrate after being presented with First Place in Architecture Contest

and earned 96 points out of a possible 100. A jury of architects judged homes on the aesthetic and functional elements of the home’s design; integration and energy efficiency of electrical and natural light; inspiration and delight to Solar Decathlon visitors; and documentation including drawings, a project manual, and an audiovisual architecture presentation that accurately reflect the constructed project on the competition site.

Comfort Zone (Awarded Saturday, October 1, 2011) Contest
Ohio State University topped the contestants in the Comfort Zone Contest,

Ohio State University’s enCORE shines brightly at night

The Ohio State University team shows visitors the air supply system of their house, enCORE

with 98.652 out of 100 points for maintaining indoor temperatures between 71 and 76 degrees Fahrenheit and relative humidity below 60 percent.

Communications (Awarded Friday, September 30, 2011) Contest
Middlebury College’s communications efforts,

Middlebury College’s Self-Reliance shines brightly at night after a stormy day

Middlebury College students pose for photo after accepting the first place award for Communication Contest

including communications plans, student-led tours, and team website, were judged by a jury of website and public relations experts, and won the contest with a score of 90 points out of a possible 100 points.

Engineering (Awarded Thursday, September 29, 2011) Contest
New Zealand won the Engineering contest,

New Zealand’s First Light shines brightly at night

New Zealand’s Victoria University of Wellington celebrate after taking first place in Engineering Contest

which was evaluated by a group of prominent engineers, who determined which solar home best exemplified excellence in functionality, efficiency, innovation, reliability and documentation of its energy systems. New Zealand scored 93 out of a possible 100 points.

Home Entertainment (Awarded Saturday, October 1, 2011) Contest
Middlebury College earned 98.560 out of a possible 100 points in this contest, which required students to use electricity generated by their solar houses to run interior and exterior lights, a TV, a computer, and a kitchen appliance to boil water. Teams were also required to hold two dinner parties and a movie night for neighbors.

Middlebury College’s student Melissa Segil prepares a dish during a competition dinner party

Hot Water (Awarded Saturday, October 1, 2011) Contest
Seven teams tied for first and earned the full 100 points in the Hot Water contest’s “shower tests,” which aimed to deliver 15 gallons of hot water in ten minutes or less. Of course, the water was heated by the sun. Tying for top honors in this contest were:  Appalachian State University,  University of Maryland, New Zealand’s Ghent University, Ohio State UniversityParsons NS Stevens, SCI-Arc/Caltech, and Tennessee.

Chelsea Royall, front, Team Design Director of Appalachian State University, talks about her team’s house (The Solar Homestead) on Media Preview Day

New Zealand’s First Light’s dining room

Maryland’s Watershed clear view

   University of TN’s Living Light shines brightly at night

Future homeowners of Empowerhouse of Parson New School of Design & Stevens Institute of Technology  

rainbow seen between SCI-Arc/Caltech’CHIP (left) & Ohio State University’s  enCORE(right)

Energy Balance (Awarded Saturday, October 1, 2011) Contest
Seven teams tied for first and earned the full 100 points in the Energy Balance contest. Teams earned points for producing at least as much energy as their houses needed during the contest week. The teams accomplished this by balancing production and consumption. Tying for top honors in this contest were:  Florida International,

Illinois, Maryland, New Zealand, Purdue, SCI-Arc/Caltech, and Tennessee.

Market Appeal (Awarded Saturday, October 1, 2011) Contest
Middlebury College won the Market Appeal contest, which evaluated whether the cost-effective construction and solar technology in a team’s design would create a viable product on the open market. Judges gauged market appeal based on three criteria:  livability, marketability and constructability. Middlebury earned 95 points out of a possible 100 as judged by the professional jury.

More about the Solar Decathlon

The U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2011 is an award-winning program that challenges collegiate students from around the world to design, build and operate solar-powered houses that are affordable, highly energy efficient, attractive, and easy to live in. The competition shows consumers how to save money and energy with affordable clean energy products that are available today. The nearly two-year projects culminated in an unprecedented display of affordable green living and design on the National Mall’s West Potomac Park from September 23 – October 2, 2011. The Solar Decathlon also provides participating students with hands-on experience and unique training that prepares them to enter our nation’s clean energy workforce, supporting the Obama Administration’s goal of transitioning to a clean energy economy while saving families and businesses money.

posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker, sunisthefuture@gmail.com

Homepage: http://sunisthefuture.net

Any comments and suggestions are welcomed at sunisthefuture@gmail.com

Please also get into the habit of checking at these sites below for more on solar energy topics:

www.sunisthefuture.net

www.youtube.com/user/sunisthefuture

www.kiva.org/team/sunisthefuture

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29 September

Solar Decathlon 2011-Winners of Engineering Contest

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Dear Readers,

If you are in favor of renewable,  clean, or solar energy, please sign this petition for FIT/CLEAN Program, accessible at http://sunisthefuture.net/?page_id=1065 Thank you very much.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MibIzEE-xOE

Now, let’s return to Solar Decathlon of 2011. For the Engineering Contest of Solar Decathlon of 2011, each house was evaluated by a group of prominent engineers on the basis of energy efficiency savings, creative design innovations,  the functionality and reliability of each system, and documentation.  “Innovative engineering that maximizes energy efficiency in a home is the heart of the Solar Decathlon,” said Richard King, director of the Solar Decathlon for the U.S.Department of Energy.  “The impresseive houses designed by this year’s collegiate teams all have practical applications that can help every American family save money.  This year’s houses are proving to be highly reliable, which is a testament to their engineering excellence.”

New Zealand, Victoria University of Wellington’s First Light, scored 93 out of a possible 100 points, took first place in the Engineering Contest.

New Zealand's First Light house after a stormy day, shines brightly at night

 

Team members from New Zealand's Victoria University of Wellington celebrate after taking first place in Engineering Contest

New Zealand team members work to assemble their First Light house

 

First Light, Victoria University of Wellington’s U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2011 entry is inspired by the traditional New Zealand holiday/vacation home, “Kiwi bach”.  First Light’s design reflects a relaxed lifestyle in which socialization and connection to the outdoors are central to living.  There is a triple-glazed skylight and large bi-fold doors at the central section that functions as a bridge between exterior and interior.  A cedar canopy supports the solar array, which produces hot water and generates energy to power the house.  Custom built furniture in the living room can transform to accommodate overnight guests.  An innovative drying cupboard that dries clothes quickly by pumping solar-heated hot water through a heat exchange. Another interesting feature of this house is the use of recycled sheep’s wool as insulation.  Although First Light is inspired by a vacation home, it is already sold/intended as a permanent residence for a New Zealand couple.

SCIArc/Caltech (The Southern California Institute of Architecture and California Institute of Technology) ‘s CHIP received second place in the Engineering Contest with 91 points.

CHIP of  SCI-Arc/Caltech offers a solution to the challenges of home ownership and energy consumption for those living in the Los Angeles area. It is an affordable dwelling with a small footprint that can be used as infill or placed in zoning that accommodates shared lots. One finds a vinyl-coated fabric mesh that protects the house and contains the “outsulation” that envelopes the structure. An interior stepped in multiple levels that distinguish one level from another without compartmentalization. 3-D camera that track movement in the house and adjusts the lights accordingly.  A custom iPad application that displays real-time energy use, controls the shade, and provides instant feedback. I was quite intrigued by the fact that one can simply point/wave in the direction for the lights or movie screen to be turned on or off .

students of SCI/Arc-Caltech (CA Institute of Architecture and CA Institute of Technology) received 2nd place in Engineering Contest

SCI-Arc/Caltech at night after a stormy day

SCI-Arc/Caltech's iPad app to control wirelessly the lights, shade, and entertainment system

The University of Tennessee’s Living Light  took third place with 90 points.

Living Light, of the University of Tennessee, has  forms and spaces  inspired by the cantilever barns of southern Appalachia, the systems in the dynamic facade and integrated roof array are scalable and tunable to a range of climates and applications.  Some of its special features include:  a dynamic double facade system made of alternating translucent and transparent panes and horizontal blinds; sensors that automatically manage the electric lighting (which includes color-changing LED strip lights along the facade);a home automation system that can be programmed  with preferred conditions for activities such as watching a movie or entertaining dinner guests; a blind system sandwiched between two panes of glass (programmed to provide year round lighting and shading;an energy recovery ventilator that harvests air through the double facade system to supply the house with passively warmed or cooled fresh air.

University of Tennessee's Living Light shines brightly at night after a stormy day

Students from the University of Tennessee work on Living Light's eco-friendly landscaping

two low carbon transportation options: a bike and an electric vehicle charging station 

 

More (photos and videos) to come in future posts. Thanks to many of the photos shared by Stefano Paltera & Carol Anna).

 

sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker, sunisthefuture@gmail.com

Homepage: http://sunisthefuture.net
Any comments and suggestions are welcomed at sunisthefuture@gmail.com

Please also get into the habit of checking at these sites below for more on solar energy topics:

www.sunisthefuture.net

www.youtube.com/user/sunisthefuture

www.kiva.org/team/sunisthefuture

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25 August

Solar Decathlon (8)-Team Tennessee-University of Tennessee’s Living Light House

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If you are in favor of renewable,  clean, or solar energy, please sign this petition for FIT/CLEAN Program, accessible at http://sunisthefuture.net/?page_id=1065 Thank you very much. We are at a critical juncture in human history when individual effort and participation in the transition into renewable energy age is desperately needed!  Your signature will be very meaningful in helping all earthlings!  For a summary of why we need to switch to power the earth with Wind-Water-Sunlight quickly, reasons are explained by Stanford Professor Mark Z. Jacobson at  http://sunisthefuture.net/?m=20110731 There are more than sixteen episodes of discussions on FIT (Feed-In-Tariff/CLEAN Program) available at http://sunisthefuture.net Please feel free to read/listen to them (type in feed-in-tariff in the search box at right).

For this episode of Solar Decathlon of 2011, let’s take you through the Living Light House of University of Tennessee of Knoxville.  Living Light House is a zero energy dwelling, integrating technology seamlessly into the design without the visual clutter of the information age.  Volume and light are key features of this design.  The floor plan frames the open living space into two quarters of public and private areas. The North and South facades provide excellent natural lighting and have operable dual  layering windows with motorized sun-shading blinds mounted between panels.  The public quarter includes kitchen appliances and  can be completely concealed from the public view. This open living space with adaptable furniture can accommodate great variety of household activities.  For example, the exterior table can be moved indoor to seat more people; the entertainment center can  be used as a desk or a  foot-board;the bed can be concealed or pulled out depending on whether it is needed. The private quarter contains bathroom and bedroom elements. Design of Living Light House intends to leave a small footprint;this is seen in its slightly upon the ground construction,  its extensive use of local wood in interior and exterior finish to reduce environmental impact, and the fact that the house is a prefabricated module that can be easily transported to site via trailer (so to reduce energy consumption by eliminating reconstruction of the structure at the site).  The house  has adaptable use of its mechanical system for different seasons and it also takes advantage of its natural ventilation.  The rooftop provides both shade and energy for the house because the tubular structure of array  has integrated PV system for absorbing solar energy and the white roof  of the house reflects light back into  the array for additional energy.  Indoor thermal comfort is preserved by well insulated elements.  Dual layer windows with additional barrier provides additional insulation and cross ventilation when the interior layer is opened.  There are two miniature ductless heating units, available when additional heating is needed.  The overall design of the Living Light House  functions to adapt to nature and its occupants while integrating a simple design principle and observing the need for energy efficiency so to reduce energy dependence on depleting resources.  Now let’s have a look of the Living Light House of University of Tennessee—>

 

written and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker, sunisthefuture@gmail.com

Homepage:   http://sunisthefuture.net http://sunisthefuture.org http://sunisthefuture.com
Any comments and suggestions are welcomed at sunisthefuture@gmail.com

Please also get into the habit of checking at these sites below for more on solar energy topics:

www.sunisthefuture.net

www.youtube.com/user/sunisthefuture

www.kiva.org/team/sunisthefuture

www.facebook.com/sunisthefuture

www.pinterest.com/sunisthefuture

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