Posts Tagged ‘wind energy’

19 June

Solar & Wind, No Longer The Smallest Kids On The Energy Block

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This is a repost from our sister publication, Windermere Sun, below:

wind surfing (photo by Olga Shevchenko, presented at: WindermereSun.com)

sunset sun rays (photo by Susan Sun Nunamaker, presented at: WindermereSun.com)

wind turbine (photo by Paul Davison, presented at: WindermereSun.com)

solar panels reflecting the sky (photo by: Debbie Mous, presented at: WindermereSun.com)

wind farm (photo by Drew Broadley, presented at: WindermereSun.com)

solar energy (photo by: Alla Leitus, presented at: WindermereSun.com)

Oh my God dis is my favourite 🙂 (photo by kenchu, presented at: WindermereSun.com)

Solar Panels on Space Vehicle (photo by: SpaceX, presented at: WindermereSun.com)

wind energy (photo by Arno Nym, presented at: WindermereSun.com)

solar panels (photo by Rainer Berg, presented at: WindermereSun.com)

windmill (photo by Christophe Grasseau, presented at: WindermereSun.com)

skyscraper solar stone (photo by: Valerij Zhugan, presented at: WindermereSun.com)

windmill (photo by Dora Mitsonia, presented at: WindermereSun.com)

solar (photo by frederico pinto, presented at: WindermereSun.com)

Windermere Blue Sunset (credit: Windermere Sun-Susan Sun Nunamaker)

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monthly net electricity generation from selected fuels (Jan.-March, 2017, credit: U.S. EIA), presented at: WindermereSun.com

monthly net electricity generation from selected fuels, in % (Jan.-March, 2017, credit: U.S. EIA) presented at: WindermereSun.com

In March of 2017, according to a new U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) report, ten percent of all of the electricity generated in United States came from wind and solar power. This milestone demonstrates that renewable energy are becoming significant source of electricity in U.S. and no longer need to be classified as “alternative” energy. Texas is the biggest wind power producer while California is the largest solar producer in USA.

Below, in italics, is taken from EIA report on June 14, 2017)

For the first time, monthly electricity generation from wind and solar (including utility-scale plants and small-scale systems) exceeded 10% of total electricity generation in the United States, based on March data in EIA’s Electric Power Monthly. Electricity generation from both of these energy sources has grown with increases in wind and solar generating capacity. On an annual basis, wind and solar made up 7% of total U.S. electric generation in 2016.

Electricity generation from wind and solar follows seasonal patterns that reflect the seasonal availability of wind and sunshine. Within the United States, wind patterns vary based on geography. For example, wind-powered generating units in Texas, Oklahoma, and nearby states often have their highest output in spring months, while wind-powered generators in California are more likely to have their highest output in summer months.

Monthly solar output is highest in the summer months, regardless of location, because of the greater number of daylight hours. About half of all utility-scale solar power plants in the United States use some form of sun-tracking technology to improve their seasonal output.

Based on seasonal patterns in recent years, electricity generation from wind and solar will probably exceed 10% of total U.S. generation again in April 2017, then fall to less than 10% in the summer months. Since 2014, when EIA first began estimating monthly, state-level electricity generation from small-scale solar photovoltaic systems, combined wind and solar generation has reached its highest level in either the spring or fall. Because these seasons are times of generally low electricity demand, combined wind and solar generation also reached its highest share of the U.S. total during these times of year.

Based on annual data for 2016, Texas accounted for the largest total amount of wind and solar electricity generation. Nearly all of this generation was from wind, as Texas generates more wind energy than any other state. As a share of the state’s total electricity generation, wind and solar output was highest in Iowa, where wind and solar made up 37% of electricity generation in 2016. In addition to Iowa, wind and solar provided at least 20% of 2016 electricity generation in six other states.

In almost all states, wind makes up a larger share of the state’s total electricity generation than solar. Among the top dozen states, only California and Arizona had more solar generation than wind in 2016. Three states in the top 12—Iowa, Kansas, and North Dakota—had no generation from utility-scale solar plants in 2016 and relatively little output from small-scale solar photovoltaic systems.

EIA analyst Owen Comstock said state renewable goals are one of the biggest reasons how wind and solar are able to reach this milestone. Most states require a certain portion of their electricity to be generated from renweables. States such as California is currently setting its goal to obtain 50% of its electricity from renewables by 2030, and lawmakers in CA are debating about the possibility of expanding that to 100% by 2045.

For those of us in Florida, even without with any government incentive or mandate, due to the dramatic dropping of cost in solar and wind, as long as we pay attention and take actions, we will be on our way to hit the 100% renewables goal before 2045. Based on SEIA (Solar Energy Industries Association), Floridians have installed 725.1 MW solar by 2016 (404.7 MW was installed in 2016). More will be provided in the next post.

 


Photographed, gathered, written, and posted by Windermere Sun-Susan Sun Nunamaker
More about the community at www.WindermereSun.com

Any comments, suggestions, concerns regarding this post will be welcomed at info.WindermereSun@gmail.com

~have a bright and sunny day~

Any comments, suggestions, concerns regarding this post will be welcomed at sunisthefuture@gmail.com

Gathered, written, and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker

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Please also get into the habit of checking at these sites below for more on solar energy topics:

www.sunisthefuture.net

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7 July

Dwelling With The Spirit of Freedom-Less Is More Life Style With Ecocapsule

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Dear Friends, Visitors/Viewers/Readers,

Ecocapsule (credit: Ecocapsule of Nice Architects)

Dwelling With The Spirit of Freedom-Ecocapsule (credit: Ecocapsule of Nice Architects)

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In recent years, many people have started to become attracted to the concept of Living Small or Tiny House. A Slovakian design firm, Nice Architects, incorporated concepts of “micro-living”, being “eco-friendly”, and “self-sufficient” and developed the egg-shaped Ecocapsules (some call it ecopod). This design of ecopod can house two people for a year off the grid, with a warm bed,

Ecocapsule interior (credit: Ecocapsule of Nice Architects)

Ecocapsule interior (credit: Ecocapsule of Nice Architects)

a kitchenette, toilet and shower and work/dining area, running water, and hot food, all powered by 2.6 sq meters of solar panels and a 750 w retractable wind turbine. These small pods are designed to capture,  treat (with a built-in filter system), and store rainwater as potable water. These ecopods are 2.55 meters (100.4 inches) high, 4.45 meters (175.2 inches) long, and 2.25 meters (88.6 inches) wide. The fact that these ecopods/Ecocapsules can be towed by a trailer, airlifted, (even be pulled by a pack of animals), or fitted into a shipping container means that they can be transported and used any where on planet earth.

Ecocapsule on a hillside (credit: Ecocapsule of Nice Architects)

Ecocapsule on a hillside (credit: Ecocapsule of Nice Architects)

Ecocapsules in city atop buildings (credit: Ecocapsule of Nice Architects)

Ecocapsules in city atop buildings (credit: Ecocapsule of Nice Architects)

Enjoying a beach holiday in Ecocapsule (credit: Ecocapsule of Nice Architects)

Enjoying a beach holiday in Ecocapsule (credit: Ecocapsule of Nice Architects)

Ecocapsule being self-sufficient (credit: Ecocapsule of Nice Architects)

Ecocapsule being self-sufficient (credit: Ecocapsule of Nice Architects)

A prototype of the Ecocapsule was on display at Vienna’s Pioneers Festival in May 28-30, 2015, and customised pods will be available from the end of 2016. Pre-orders are expected to open at the end of 2015, with delivery in 2016.

Imagine your future holidays on a beach,  gazing or sleeping under the stars, or going camping will take on a different meaning….

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic Specs:

  1. Dimension: (HxLxW)2.55×4.45×2.25m/4.5m with extended pole
  2. Weight: 1500 kg
  3. Installed power output: wind 750w, solar 600w
  4. Battery capacity: 9744 wh

For more information, please check out: ECOCAPSULE

~have a bright and sunny day~

Gathered, written, and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker

Any comments and suggestions are welcomed at sunisthefuture@gmail.com

Please also get into the habit of checking at these sites below for more on solar energy topics:

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26 March

SSB 1234 of State of Iowa

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Dear Friends, Visitors/Viewers/Readers

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Another informative summary concerning state of Iowa’s passage to renewable energy, from our friend Paul Gipe, below:

Proposal Four Times Comparable Size of Los Angeles DWP’s Solar FIT

Comparable to Gainesville, Florida’s Annual Per Capita Rate

Payment for Wind to be Based on Utility’s Rate of Return

Could the conservative heartland state of Iowa breach the dam holding back feed-in tariffs for renewable energy in the US when self-styled “progressive” states such as California continue to dawdle? That is the possible implication of a vote by the Agriculture Committee of Iowa’s state Senate Thursday, 7 March 2013.

Political observers and the media often overlook mid-western states in deference to presumably more trendsetting states on the west coast. However, many  of the progressive movements in US history have grown out of grassroots campaigns in the nation’s heartland. The same could be true for feed-in tariffs.

The bill, SSB 1234, has a long ways to go should it ever become law, and the odds against it, as in most other states, are very long as powerful forces begin aligning against it. Nevertheless, the bill now moves to the Senate floor.

Significantly, the bill passed the Agriculture Committee unanimously. That is, the bill not only received the support of Democrats in the Democratically controlled chamber, but also support by Republicans on the committee. This bodes well for at least consideration by the Republican controlled House should the bill pass the Senate.

In another departure for much of the current discussion across the country and in particular on proposals for feed-in tariffs, SSB 1234 is not about solar photovoltaics. No, the bill is aimed at distributed wind energy and is limited to projects less than 20 MW.

Iowa knows a lot about wind energy and it is comfortable with the technology. In 2012, Iowa produced 24.5% of generation by in-state wind energy, far more than the one-time leader California’s 5%. Even in absolute numbers, Iowa’s 14 TWh of wind generation exceeded that of California’s 10 TWh in 2012.

However, nearly all wind energy in Iowa is found in large wind power plants developed by multinational utility companies. Only a very small percentage of Iowa’s wind generation is produced by small, distributed projects and even less is owned by Iowans themselves.

The bill allows distributed wind projects to account for one-half of the annual growth in residential electricity consumption. One estimate is that this could be up to 60 MW per year. If true, Iowa’s proposal is four times greater than the much heralded, some would say over hyped, feed-in tariff program of Los Angeles’ Department of Water & Power that is limited to 20 MW per year.

Iowa’s SSB 1234 is a milestone in renewable policy proposals in the US since Tea Party reactionaries seized legislatures across the country in 2010. As one activist suggested, this could finally be a sign of brightening fortunes for feed-in tariffs.

Unlike advocates in other states, where solar only bills monopolize feed-in tariff discussion, renewable proponents in Iowa are more inclusive. Proponents of SSB 1234 hope to add biomass and solar once the bill reaches the floor of the Senate.

One of the bill’s key features is using the connecting utility’s regulated rate of return in calculating the tariff that would be paid under the standard offer contract. Renewable advocates have long proposed that distributed or locally-owned renewables should be paid a tariff that includes calculation of a rate of return equal to that granted electric utilities. In most countries and in most proposals in North America, however, regulators use a much lower rate of return for investment in distributed renewables than the utilities receive themselves. Sometimes the return acceptable to regulators for distributed renewables is half that received by regulated utilities.

Summary of Key Features

Program cap: ½ of annual retail electricity consumption growth

Project cap: 20 MW

Geographic limit: only on agricultural land

Interconnection: mandatory for utilities

Tariff determination: based on cost to utility, inclusive of the utility’s regulated rate of return

Contract term: 10 years

Review: biannual

SSB1234 Bill History

SSB1234 Bill Contents

~have a bright and sunny day~

Gathered and posted by sunisthefuture-Susan Sun Nunamaker

Any of your comments or suggestions will be welcomed at sunisthefuture@gmail.com

Homepage: http://www.sunisthefuture.net

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